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Confirming Truth
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Pretty interesting, I must admit. Goes into the state of mind of the people of that period in American history. Enjoy!


Verification of letter: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7035/6790780585_466117fe88_o.jpg


Link to readable letter: http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/01/to-my-old-master.html

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Confirming Truth
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At the least, this letter can further advance the cause of reparation, as it carries legitimacy, unlike the Willy Lynch bogus nonsense.
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Confirming Truth
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He really laid into him at the closing! The epitome of sarcasm and irony captured in such a polite statement! HOLY ****! I can only imagine the face of the former master as he read that final line to the letter, HOLY MOLLY!
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Mike111
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^That reminds me of those nice Christian stories that a friend used to email me. They were always poignant and wonderfully heart rending. But I always wondered if by making a wonderful story Christians were then immune from retribution, or whether they still had to burn in Hell for the lie.
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the lioness,
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Monday, 30 January 2012


In August of 1865, a Colonel P.H. Anderson of Big Spring, Tennessee, wrote to his former slave, Jourdan Anderson, and requested that he come back to work on his farm. Jourdan — who, since being emancipated, had moved to Ohio, found paid work, and was now supporting his family — responded spectacularly by way of the letter seen below (a letter which, according to newspapers at the time, he dictated).

Rather than quote the numerous highlights in this letter, I'll simply leave you to enjoy it. Do make sure you read to the end.

(Source: The Freedmen's Book; Image: A group of escaped slaves in Virginia in 1862, courtesy of the Library of Congress.)

Dayton, Ohio,

August 7, 1865

To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin's to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, "Them colored people were slaves" down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor's visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams's Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant,

Jourdon Anderson.

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stevelawns
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Really nice impressive, first time I hear this story.

Stinger Detox

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Ish Gebor
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Slave owners lived in fear of slave revolts, a fear which was far from unfounded: from the Amistad mutiny to the Underground Railroad, American slaves—led by themselves or with the help of abolitionists—staged many instances of revolt and resistance. Read the timeline below to learn more about the history of slave rebellions.


1663: First serious slave conspiracy in Colonial America
White servants and black slaves conspire to revolt in Gloucester County, VA, but are betrayed by a fellow servant.

1739: The Stono Rebellion

The deadliest revolt in Colonial America takes place in Stono, SC. Armed slaves start marching to Florida and towards freedom, but the insurrection is put down and at least 20 whites and more than 40 blacks are killed.

1791: Haiti slave revolt

Former slave Toussaint L'Ouverture leads a slave revolt in Haiti, West Indies. He is captured in 1802, but the revolt continues and Haitian independence is declared. Southerners are terrified by these events as they discourage the importation of slaves into the United States.

1800: Gabriel Prosser’s rebellion

In the spring of 1800, Prosser, a deeply religious man, begins plotting an invasion of Richmond, Virginia and an attack on its armory. By summer he has enlisted more than 1,000 slaves and collected an armory of weapons, organizing the first large-scale slave revolt in the U.S. On the day of the revolt, the bridges leading to Richmond are destroyed in a flood, and Prosser is betrayed. The state militia attacks, and Prosser and 35 of his men are hanged.

1811: Louisiana revolt

Louisiana slaves revolt in two parishes near New Orleans. The revolt is suppressed by U.S. troops.

1816: Fort Blount revolt

Three hundred slaves and about 20 Native American allies hold Fort Blount on Apalachicola Bay, Florida for several days before being attacked by U.S. troops.

1822: Denmark Vesey’s revolt

A freed man, Vesey had won a lottery and purchased his emancipation in 1800. He is working as a carpenter in Charleston, South Carolina when he starts to plan a massive slave rebellion—one of the most elaborate plots in American history—involving thousands of slaves on surrounding plantations, organized into cells. They would start a major fire at night, and then kill the slave owners and their families. Vesey is betrayed and hanged, but the cell structure prevents officials from identifying other leaders.

1831: Nat Turner’s revolt

Nat Turner plans a slave revolt in Southampton County, Virginia, the only effective, sustained slave rebellion in U.S. history. Sixty whites are killed before Turner and his followers are captured and hanged.

1831–1862: The Underground Railroad

Approximately 75,000 slaves escape to the North and to freedom via the Underground Railroad, a system in which free African American and white "conductors," abolitionists and sympathizers help guide and shelter the escapees.

1838: Frederick Douglass escapes

Frederick Douglass escapes from slavery in Baltimore. He later publishes his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself, and becomes a leading abolitionist.

1839: The Amistad mutiny

Led by a West African named Cinque, slaves transported aboard the Spanish ship Amistad stage a mutiny, killing the entire crew except for the captain and first mate and demanding to be sailed back to Africa. Instead, the captain sails to New York. The rebels eventually win their freedom in a landmark Supreme Court case in which they are defended by former president John Quincy Adams.

1841: Creole revolt

Slaves revolt on the Creole, a slave trading ship sailing from Virginia to Louisiana. The rebels overpower the crew and successfully sail to the Bahamas, where they are granted asylum and freedom.

1849: Harriet Tubman escapes

Harriet Tubman escapes from slavery in Maryland. She becomes one of the best-known "conductors" on the Underground Railroad, returning to the South 19 times and helping more than 300 slaves escape to freedom.

1859: Harper’s Ferry Attack

Led by abolitionist John Brown, a group of slaves and white abolitionists stage an attack on Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. They capture the federal armory and arsenal before the insurrection is halted by local militia. Brown and the other captives are tried and executed. The raid hastens the advent of the Civil War, which starts two years later.


http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/natturner/slave_rebellions.html

http://www.slaveryinamerica.org/resources/gw_rebellion.htm

This is solely about North America, with the exception of Haiti.

The rest of the Americas could be listed as well.

If you study the willy lynch letter you will find that there is a consensus all over the Americas. [Wink]


Verification,


 -  -


http://www.nps.gov/subjects/ugrr/discover_history/slave-rebellions.htm

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Ish Gebor
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Howard Zinn's history of slavery and slave revolts in the United States from 1619 up until 1741.


A black American writer, J. Saunders Redding, describes the arrival of a ship in North America in the year 1619:

Sails furled, flag drooping at her rounded stern, she rode the tide in from the sea. She was a strange ship, indeed, by all accounts, a frightening ship, a ship of mystery. Whether she was trader, privateer, or man-of-war no one knows. Through her bulwarks black-mouthed cannon yawned. The flag she flew was Dutch; her crew a motley. Her port of call, an English settlement, Jamestown, in the colony of Virginia. She came, she traded, and shortly afterwards was gone. Probably no ship in modern history has carried a more portentous freight. Her cargo? Twenty slaves.


There is not a country in world history in which racism has been more important, for so long a time, as the United States. And the problem of "the color line," as W. E. B. Du Bois put it, is still with us. So it is more than a purely historical question to ask: How does it start?—and an even more urgent question: How might it end? Or, to put it differently: Is it possible for whites and blacks to live together without hatred?

       If history can help answer these questions, then the beginnings of slavery in North America—a continent where we can trace the coming of the first whites and the first blacks—might supply at least a few clues.

       Some historians think those first blacks in Virginia were considered as servants, like the white indentured servants brought from Europe. But the strong probability is that, even if they were listed as "servants" (a more familiar category to the English), they were viewed as being different from white servants, were treated differently, and in fact were slaves. In any case, slavery developed quickly into a regular institution, into the normal labor relation of blacks to whites in the New World. With it developed that special racial feeling—whether hatred, or contempt, or pity, or patronization—that accompanied the inferior position of blacks in America for the next 350 years —that combination of inferior status and derogatory thought we call racism.

       Everything in the experience of the first white settlers acted as a pressure for the enslavement of blacks.

       The Virginians of 1619 were desperate for labor, to grow enough food to stay alive. Among them were survivors from the winter of 1609-1610, the "starving time," when, crazed for want of food, they roamed the woods for nuts and berries, dug up graves to eat the corpses, and died in batches until five hundred colonists were reduced to sixty.

       In the Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia is a document of 1619 which tells of the first twelve years of the Jamestown colony. The first settlement had a hundred persons, who had one small ladle of barley per meal. When more people arrived, there was even less food. Many of the people lived in cavelike holes dug into the ground, and in the winter of 1609-1610, they were ...driven through insufferable hunger to eat those things which nature most abhorred, the flesh and excrements of man as well of our own nation as of an Indian, digged by some out of his grave after he had laid buried there days and wholly devoured him; others, envying the better state of body of any whom hunger has not yet so much wasted as their own, lay wait and threatened to kill and eat them; one among them slew his wife as she slept in his bosom, cut her in pieces, salted her and fed upon her till he had clean devoured all parts saving her head...


       A petitionby thirty colonists to the House of Burgesses, complaining against the twelve-year governorship of Sir Thomas Smith, said:

In those 12 years of Sir Thomas Smith, his government, we aver that the colony for the most part remained in great want and misery under most severe and cruel laws... The allowance in those times for a man was only eight ounces of meale and half a pint of peas for a day... mouldy, rotten, full of cobwebs and maggots, loathsome to man and not fit for beasts, which forced many to flee for relief to the savage enemy, who being taken again were put to sundry deaths as by hanging, shooting and breaking upon the wheel... of whom one for stealing two or three pints of oatmeal had a bodkin thrust through his tongue and was tied with a chain to a tree until he starved...


       The Virginians needed labor, to grow corn for subsistence, to grow tobacco for export. They had just figured out how to grow tobacco, and in 1617 they sent off the first cargo to England. Finding that, like all pleasureable drugs tainted with moral disapproval, it brought a high price, the planters, despite their high religious talk, were not going to ask questions about something so profitable.

       They couldn't force the Indians to work for them, as Columbus had done. They were outnumbered, and while, with superior firearms, they could massacre Indians, they would face massacre in return. They could not capture them and keep them enslaved; the Indians were tough, resourceful, defiant, and at home in these woods, as the transplanted Englishmen were not.

       White servants had not yet been brought over in sufficient quantity. Besides, they did not come out of slavery, and did not have to do more than contract their labor for a few years to get their passage and a start in the New World. As for the free white settlers, many of them were skilled craftsmen, or even men of leisure back in England, who were so little inclined to work the land that John Smith, in those early years, had to declare a kind of martial law, organize them into work gangs, and force them into the fields for survival.

       There may have been a kind of frustrated rage at their own ineptitude, at the Indian superiority at taking care of themselves, that made the Virginians especially ready to become the masters of slaves. Edmund Morgan imagines their mood as he writes in his book American Slavery, American Freedom:


Etc...
http://libcom.org/history/1619-1741-slavery-slave-rebellion-us

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Brada-Anansi
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TP I think the Willy Lynch letter was fraudulent,not that practices were not used in the letter during the era but the document is questionable.
http://manuampim.com/lynch_hoax1.html
Go here ^ the author of this link is non other then Manu Ampim.

But the first ass kickers of the slave system was Yanga of Mexico,The most Brutal ass kickers were the Haitians and the most consistent ass kickers were the Jamaicans.

With the current trend to re-whiting history from Texas school boards Virginia politicos wanting to tell the civil-war narrative with-out mentioning slavery, I re-post this here often talked about but still mis-understood aspect of the African experience in the new world that Africans and people of African decent did not simply lay down and accept their oppression..they fought and did so with honor,they used various means to unite and fight their enemies,sometimes with allies form native-Americans sometimes with indentured white slaves and at times with no friends at all,they used what ever spiritual beliefs to aid them from Christianity to some of ancient African oldest religious beliefs.


Read more: http://egyptsearchreloaded.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=hist&action=display&thread=105#ixzz1l8nKZE9O

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Ish Gebor
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“There Was Never Any Pay-day For the Negroes”: Jourdon Anderson Demands Wages

As slavery collapsed at the close of the Civil War, former slaves quickly explored freedom’s possibilities by establishing churches that were independent of white control, seeking education in Freedmen’s Bureau schools, and even building and maintaining their own schools. Many took to the roads as they sought opportunities to work and to reconstitute their families. Securing their liberty meant finding the means of support to obtain land or otherwise benefit from their own labor, as Jourdon Anderson made clear in this letter to his former owner. He addressed Major Anderson from Ohio, where he had secured good wages for himself and schooling for his children. Many freedpeople argued that they were entitled to land in return for their years of unpaid labor and looked to the federal government to help achieve economic self-sufficiency. Black southerners understood the value of their own labor and looked for economic independence and a free labor market in their battle over the meaning of emancipation in post-Civil War America.


http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/6369/


The Freedmen's Book, by "L. Maria Child" (Lydia Maria Child), was published in 1865 by Ticknor and Fields (Boston). It was intended for use by recently freed African Americans, who were flocking to whatever schools they could find in order to learn to read.


http://myweb.wssu.edu/wallr/child/child.htm


Lydia Maria Child (February 11, 1802-Oct. 20, 1880) was a novelist, editor, journalist and scholar who produced a body of work remarkable for its brilliance, originality and variety, much of it inspired by a strong sense of justice and love of freedom. Little known today, in her own time she was a famously radical abolitionist. She was a student of world religions with a breadth of vision and understanding extraordinary for her time. She was lonely religiously, dissatisfied with the institutional church and hungry for spiritual nourishment. Child is now remembered primarily, if at all, as author of the Thanksgiving poem, "Over the river and through the wood . . . " She deserves an honored place in American and in Unitarian history, though she was critical of the Unitarianism of her day.

...Living in Medford for the winter of 1860-61, Maria plunged into Boston activism, writing that "When there is anti-slavery work to be done, I feel as young as twenty." Back in Wayland when war broke out, she gathered supplies for the "contrabands," slaves who fled for safety to Union lines, and compiled her Freedmen's Book, a reading primer for former slaves ...

http://www25.uua.org/uuhs/duub/articles/lydiamariachild.html


[Frown] [Embarrassed] [Eek!]

quote:
Originally posted by Confirming Truth:
Pretty interesting, I must admit. Goes into the state of mind of the people of that period in American history. Enjoy!


Verification of letter: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7035/6790780585_466117fe88_o.jpg


Link to readable letter: http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/01/to-my-old-master.html


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zarahan- aka Enrique Cardova
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Good info Patrol.
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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by zarahan- aka Enrique Cardova:
Good info Patrol.

[Big Grin] [Cool]
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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by Brada-Anansi:
TP I think the Willy Lynch letter was fraudulent,not that practices were not used in the letter during the era but the document is questionable.
http://manuampim.com/lynch_hoax1.html
Go here ^ the author of this link is non other then Manu Ampim.

But the first ass kickers of the slave system was Yanga of Mexico,The most Brutal ass kickers were the Haitians and the most consistent ass kickers were the Jamaicans.

With the current trend to re-whiting history from Texas school boards Virginia politicos wanting to tell the civil-war narrative with-out mentioning slavery, I re-post this here often talked about but still mis-understood aspect of the African experience in the new world that Africans and people of African decent did not simply lay down and accept their oppression..they fought and did so with honor,they used various means to unite and fight their enemies,sometimes with allies form native-Americans sometimes with indentured white slaves and at times with no friends at all,they used what ever spiritual beliefs to aid them from Christianity to some of ancient African oldest religious beliefs.


Read more: http://egyptsearchreloaded.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=hist&action=display&thread=105#ixzz1l8nKZE9O

I don't think the letter was written by one person. But rather a consortium of people. Read and study slavery in the Americas; North, South, Central...the Caribbean. You will see many striking similarities and consensuses.

And yes I have seen Apim's story, but has Apim studied slavery in the Americas? In his "rebuttal" is appears not!

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Sundjata
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Best post yet by Confirming truth. Great read. [Smile]
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Doug M
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While a lot of people like this story, I however see it as nonsensical. For one, why on earth would the former slave even write such a letter in response? I mean seriously, would you be so nice an courteous to someone who treated you like a farm animal and then tried to shoot you when you left? What? The whole thing is another piece of PR propaganda to maintain and uphold the institution of slavery as some benign institution that was not horrible and detrimental to those enslaved. And it promotes the idea that the response should be courteous and genial as opposed to angry and even violent.

Juxtapose the way slavery is described and the response to it to the way the American Revolution against taxation is described. Please. It should be obvious that this is PR Mind Control.

And the title of the articles I have read states that this letter is "controversial" or "causing a stir". Why? Because the former slave had the nerve to sound somewhat upset? It certainly isn't controversial or causing a stir because of the evidence of brutality by the slave owners because of the obvious PR and white washing of this part of American history. It was brutal but not brutal enough to cause anyone to want to be mad and violent or demand reparations.

All of that said it does promote the idea that African Americans at the time knew the score more so than some do today.

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the lioness,
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quote:
Originally posted by Doug M:
While a lot of people like this story, I however see it as nonsensical. For one, why on earth would the former slave even write such a letter in response? I mean seriously, would you be so nice an courteous to someone who treated you like a farm animal and then tried to shoot you when you left? What? The whole thing is another piece of PR propaganda to maintain and uphold the institution of slavery as some benign institution that was not horrible and detrimental to those enslaved. And it promotes the idea that the response should be courteous and genial as opposed to angry and even violent.

Juxtapose the way slavery is described and the response to it to the way the American Revolution against taxation is described. Please. It should be obvious that this is PR Mind Control.

And the title of the articles I have read states that this letter is "controversial" or "causing a stir". Why? Because the former slave had the nerve to sound somewhat upset? It certainly isn't controversial or causing a stir because of the evidence of brutality by the slave owners because of the obvious PR and white washing of this part of American history. It was brutal but not brutal enough to cause anyone to want to be mad and violent or demand reparations.

All of that said it does promote the idea that African Americans at the time knew the score more so than some do today.

don't worry CT is leading the fight for reparations:

quote:
Originally posted by Confirming Truth:
this letter can further advance the cause of reparation


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Whatbox
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quote:
Originally posted by Doug M:
While a lot of people like this story, I however see it as nonsensical. For one, why on earth would the former slave even write such a letter in response? I mean seriously, would you be so nice an courteous to someone who treated you like a farm animal and then tried to shoot you when you left? What? The whole thing is another piece of PR propaganda to maintain and uphold the institution of slavery as some benign institution that was not horrible and detrimental to those enslaved. And it promotes the idea that the response should be courteous and genial as opposed to angry and even violent.

Juxtapose the way slavery is described and the response to it to the way the American Revolution against taxation is described. Please. It should be obvious that this is PR Mind Control.

And the title of the articles I have read states that this letter is "controversial" or "causing a stir". Why? Because the former slave had the nerve to sound somewhat upset? It certainly isn't controversial or causing a stir because of the evidence of brutality by the slave owners because of the obvious PR and white washing of this part of American history. It was brutal but not brutal enough to cause anyone to want to be mad and violent or demand reparations.

All of that said it does promote the idea that African Americans at the time knew the score more so than some do today.

Ok, what do you mean by PR & are you seriouslly saying the brutality often gets over-emphasized or exaggerated?? If so, how??
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Doug M
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PR stands for Public Relations and involves the process of forming and developing the opinions of the public relative to the activities, policies, aims and goals of an organization or other entity. This is most often accomplished via officially developed forms of communication and engagement with the public.


The PR is to down play and under emphasize the brutality and justify it and minimize it as part of American "progress".

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Whatbox
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PR, right, duh. (thanks)

Ok basically like what does this mean cuz I am like still confused.

quote:
It certainly isn't controversial or causing a stir because of the evidence of brutality by the slave owners because of the obvious PR and white washing of this part of American history.

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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by Whatbox:
PR, right, duh. (thanks)

Ok basically like what does this mean cuz I am like still confused.

quote:
It certainly isn't controversial or causing a stir because of the evidence of brutality by the slave owners because of the obvious PR and white washing of this part of American history.

Are you kidding?
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Egmond Codfried
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All the people answering here, except Mike and lioness sound like one mind, one hand. We are deceived by people using multiple nicks, who somehow cannot bear that their threads are ignored. So they organise their own fan club, which will insure favourite and uniformly positive response. The former Meninarmer is now using a Jewish sounding, Spanish or Portuguese nick, as he believes Jews have in the past prevented him and his mother from becoming major Hollywood stars. This is his justification for deceiving other Blacks with false nicks. Of course, the Jews who control this forum will allow these vagrants to use many nicks at the same time to deceive and to weaken attempts of Black researchers to free blacks from white supremacy. So the enemy of the Black is the Black itself.
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Egmond Codfried
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As to this slave letter: its contents are morally just, but it sounds more like an ideological instruction. I like the idea of talking about reparations as back-pay, not compensation for suffering. Back-pay is clear and straightforward and can be backed by hard figures. There are even records to show the profits of slave-masters and slave companies. The money can be traced to persons and companies today. Since I spilled the beans on Maria Jacoba van Goor (1687-1737), an Amsterdam regent class lady, who made her fortune in slave trade and products of slave labour, they seem to have put a restriction on the files of this family at the Utrecht Archives. As she is the grandmother of their precious Isabelle de Charriere, they hope to stem the progress of research, and people demanding back pay from these families. Van Goor’s husband’s uncle was a board member of the Society of Surinam.

http://stewartsynopsis.com/maria_jacoba_van_goor.htm

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facts
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^How the fvck do you expect back-pay when you were not even alive at the time? You are fucking nuts!
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Egmond Codfried
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The people who have the same family names as former slave owners often are wealthy and live in luxury. They have high social positions, and people in the know will recognize names of former regent families. They are rich because of the accumulation of riches. a foundation was made with the income out of slave labour. Money just does not disappear.
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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by Egmond Codfried:
The people who have the same family names as former slave owners often are wealthy and live in luxury. They have high social positions, and people in the know will recognize names of former regent families. They are rich because of the accumulation of riches. a foundation was made with the income out of slave labour. Money just does not disappear.

This is certainly true, I also heard about a list of these companies. But haven't been able to find it, till now.


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,48781,00.html

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Whatbox
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quote:
Originally posted by Troll Patrol:
quote:
Originally posted by Whatbox:
PR, right, duh. (thanks)

Ok basically like what does this mean cuz I am like still confused.

quote:
It certainly isn't controversial or causing a stir because of the evidence of brutality by the slave owners because of the obvious PR and white washing of this part of American history.

Are you kidding?
No I'm not kidding, the meaning remaineth unclear. He could have been saying something with a sarcastic tone, or saying something seriously there. See what I'm sayin? I was asking for that part again for the tone.
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