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Author Topic: Black Romans and Greeks
Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by the lioness,:
No you are trying to divert attention.

The theme of this thread is Black Romans and Greeks not "African admixture in Italy", or "Italian Mulattos"

So somebody can post any ancient Roman and propose them as a Black Roman and Ish Gebor won't question it, you'll just add to it.
So that's how European history is done on Egyptsearch. Any European king or emperor is Black. It's racist if you question it.
So just add to it. That's how do.
I'm not going to question it anymore. Any Roman Emperor you post was Black. Teach your kids.
I've got to learn to stop questioning things

LOL What happend to that blond hair blue eyed theory?

I posted who made up part of the black Romans. Sorry it hurts so bad.


" ... that's how European history is done on Egyptsearch"?

Rome was a cosmopolitan society! That is how it is done on Egypt Search. Go cry a river! LOL


quote:

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Roman Empire in the First Century, The


Two thousand years ago, at the dawn of the first century, the world was ruled by Rome. The Roman Empire struggled with problems which are surprisingly familiar: violent coups, assassination, overarching ambition, civil war, clashes between the classes as well as the sexes and questions of personal freedom versus government control.

But from the chaos, the Roman Empire would emerge stronger and more dazzling than ever before. Soon, it would stretch from Britain across Europe to the shores of North Africa; and from Spain across Greece and the Middle East to the borders of Asia. It would embrace hundreds of languages and religions and till its many cultures into a rich soil from which Western civilization would grow. Rome would become the world’s first and most enduring superpower.

Through the experiences, memories, and writings of the people who lived it, this series tells the story of that time – of the emperors, slaves, poets and peasants who wrested order from chaos, built the most cosmopolitan society the world had ever seen, and shaped The Roman Empire in the First Century.

ORDER FROM CHAOS

Millions of people — both famous and uncelebrated — play parts in the astonishing rise of Rome. Above them all is Caesar Augustus. Born in times of crisis and raised amid civil war, Augustus comes to personify the people he leads. He is contradictory: capable of both brutal violence and tender compassion. He is influential: forging the image of Roman grandeur that endures to this day. And he is enormously popular. But those who cross Augustus — his rivals Marc Antony and Cleopatra; the love poet, Ovid; even his own daughter, Julia — face dire consequences. The story of Augustan Rome is the story of greatness at a price.

YEARS OF TRIAL

In the year 14 A.D., Caesar Augustus dies and the Empire stands at a crossroads. Will Rome continue the course set by its first emperor – or return to chaos? A reluctant new emperor confronts mutiny and intrigue. At first, Tiberius struggles to emulate his predecessor, but he soon abandons the effort. His ultimate decline from ascetic ruler to reclusive despot ushers in one of the most notorious rulers of the ancient world: Caligula. As fear and conspiracy grip Rome, crisis roils the provinces. In Judaea, a charismatic leader named Jesus challenges the religious and political establishment. The local furor barely touches Rome but the legacy of Jesus will one day engulf the empire.

WINDS OF CHANGE

In the aftermath of Caligula’s madness, Claudius, the most unlikely member of the imperial family, rises to become one of the greatest emperors of the Roman Empire… only to fall victim to a brutally ambitious wife. A principled philosopher named Seneca finds himself compromised as tutor to the erratic young Emperor Nero. In Britain, a warrior queen named Boudicca battles Roman legions… and from Judaea, a revolutionary named Paul begins spreading the words of Jesus across Roman lands. Back in the capital, Nero’s disastrous rule shakes the empire to its foundation. Rome nearly burns to the ground. The empire is on the edge of disaster.

YEARS OF ERUPTION

With Nero’s death, the dynasty of Augustus comes to an end. Once again, the Empire faces an uncertain future. Rival generals fight for supremacy in the streets of Rome. A new dynasty brings another tyrant to the throne, and Mount Vesuvius erupts, burying Pompeii and thousands of people beneath a torrent of ash and mud. A young citizen survives the disaster and records the night of terror. But the Empire weathers the traumas. As the first century draws to a close, the Emperor Trajan expands the empire to its greatest geographic extent and offers new prosperity to a greater number of citizens. He sets the course for generations to come and projects the collective voice of ancient Rome across the ages.

http://pbsinternational.org/programs/roman-empire-in-the-first-century-the/
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the lioness,
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Again for the thick headed

the topic of this thread is not:


"The Cosmopolitanism of Rome and Greece"

or "African admixture in ancient Greece and Italy"

or "Berber mercenaries in the Roman Army"

The topic is "Black Romans and Greeks"

therefore if you post a a picture of of an ancient sculpture or painting the person should be Black. It's that simple, follow the thread topic.

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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by the lioness,:
Again for the thick headed

the topic of this thread is not:


"The Cosmopolitanism of Rome and Greece"

or "African admixture in ancient Greece and Italy"

or "Berber mercenaries in the Roman Army"

The topic is "Black Romans and Greeks"

therefore if you post a a picture of of an ancient sculpture or painting the person should be Black. It's that simple

[Big Grin] @ "Real expert". Rome was a cosmopolitan society! [Big Grin]

 -


quote:
Our knowledge of Black people present in Britain in early times is scanty. However, studies by scholars, archaeologists and historians have pieced together evidence about the lives of Black Romans.

One historian, Anthony Birley, in his work The African Emperor: Septimius Severus, explains that between AD 193 and 211 the Roman empire embraced a multicultural mix of peoples from Syria, Germany, Britain, Spain and Africa. Eight African men had positions of command in the northern Roman legions, and others held high rank as equestrian officers.

[...]

During his time in office, Septimius legalised marriage during military service. There is no evidence to suggest that all the Roman legionaries returned home upon their discharge from military service, so it is possible that some Black Romans married, had children, and remained in Britain after their tour of duty. Perhaps they might be considered to be Britain's first diaspora people - from North Africa.


--UK Government Web Archive.

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http:/www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/blackhistory/early_times/romans.htm

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the lioness,
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quote:
Originally posted by Ish Gebor:



quote:
Our knowledge of Black people present in Britain in early times is scanty. However, studies by scholars, archaeologists and historians have pieced together evidence about the lives of Black Romans.

One historian, Anthony Birley, in his work The African Emperor: Septimius Severus, explains that between AD 193 and 211 the Roman empire embraced a multicultural mix of peoples from Syria, Germany, Britain, Spain and Africa. Eight African men had positions of command in the northern Roman legions, and others held high rank as equestrian officers.

[...]

During his time in office, Septimius legalised marriage during military service. There is no evidence to suggest that all the Roman legionaries returned home upon their discharge from military service, so it is possible that some Black Romans married, had children, and remained in Britain after their tour of duty. Perhaps they might be considered to be Britain's first diaspora people - from North Africa.


--UK Government Web Archive.

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http:/www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/blackhistory/early_times/romans.htm [/QB]

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Severan Tondo, Septimus Severus with wife and children
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^^ this looks like a white boy with a suntan
Septimus Severus' mother was Italian, his father was Punic or berber.

Where is the evidence his father was black?

Can we get some real blacks in here? there were about 70 Roman Emperors, what else you got?

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Ish Gebor
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LOL At the loon above, getting desperate as HELL, because Rome was a cosmopolitan society!!!!! Bhahahhaha at "real expert"


"what else you got?" Hmmm well..., let's see?

quote:

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Meet the Beachy Head Lady at Eastbourne Ancestors
A rare and unexpected discovery in the UK of a sub-saharan African dating back to Roman times, found at Beachy Head. Analysis shows she grew up here - what's her story?

http://www.eastbournemuseums.co.uk/ancestors.aspx


quote:
Pictured: The 1,800-year-old face of 'Beachy Head Lady' is revealed for the first time thanks to 3D scanning

Skeleton of 30-year-old was found in Beachy Head, East Sussex in 1953

African lady lived until 245 AD - the middle of Roman period in Britain
Possible she was the wife of an official or mistress of Roman villa nearby

Researchers were able to use the size of the skull and traces of where the muscle would have met the bone to build up a picture of the face

By Ellie Zolfagharifard

Published: 13:12 GMT, 4 February 2014 | Updated: 18:02 GMT, 4 February 2014

This is the face belonging to an ancient skeleton buried in Roman times, created using the latest 3D reconstruction technology.

The so-called 'Beachy Head Lady' - because she was discovered in the East Sussex beauty spot - had her face recreated using craniofacial reconstruction techniques.

Her skeleton was first discovered in Beachy Head 1953, and she is thought to have lived around 245 AD- the middle of the Roman period in Britain.

Unusually Beachy Head Lady is from sub-Saharan Africa which was outside of the Roman Empire.

This is the face of an ancient skeleton buried in Roman times, created using 3D reconstruction techniques

Experts are not entirely sure how she ended up in Britain, but researchers believe Beachy Head Lady probably grew up in the area and was possibly the wife or mistress of a local official at a nearby Roman villa.

Another theory is that she was a merchant trading wares in Europe and chose to settle in the country.

Jo Seaman, heritage officer at Eastbourne Borough Council, said: ‘This is a fantastic discovery for the south coast.

‘We know this lady was around 30 years old, grew up in the vicinity of what is now East Sussex, ate a good diet of fish and vegetables, her bones were without disease and her teeth were in good condition.

Researchers used the size of the skull and traces of where the muscle would have met the bone to build up a picture of Beachy Head Lady's appearance

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT BEACHY HEAD LADY?

The female's skeleton suggests that the woman was around 30 years old when she died in 245AD.

Experts believe she grew up in Sussex despite being from Sub-Saharan Africa.

This is especially interesting as this area was beyond the reaches of the Roman Empire.

Because she was not found with any grave goods, archaeologists are unable to deduce what social status she was.

It is however possible that she was the wife or mistress of an official.
She may also have been a merchant traveller too.

‘Without the context of seeing the burial site or grave goods, we don’t yet know why she was here, or her social status.

‘However based on what we know of the Roman era and a similar discovery in York, it’s possible she was the wife of a local official or mistress of the extensive Roman villa which is known to be close to Eastbourne Pier, or she may have been a Merchant, plying the trade routes around the Mediterranean up to this remote European outpost.’

Mr Seaman said that isotopes showed the Beachy Head Lady was raised in or around Eastbourne from a young age. He said the skeleton was in good condition with no signs of hard labour.

Eastbourne museums paired up with the University of Dundee to use Radio-Isotope Analysis to examine bones and teeth for trace elements absorbed from food and water during an individual’s lifetime, giving a geological fingerprint to the region in which they grew up.

Her full skeleton is on show for the first time to the public at Eastbourne Borough Council’s museum service which was awarded a grant of £72,000 by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Beachy Head Lady's full skeleton is on show for the first time to the public at Eastbourne Borough Council's museum service which was awarded a grant of £72,000 by the Heritage Lottery Fund


Beachy Head is a chalk headland in Southern England, close to the town of Eastbourne

The skeleton makes up part of the Eastbourne Ancestors project at the museum.

The aim was to identify the gender and age of each skeleton in its collection to build up stories about them.

Testing of the bones and teeth has identified the national or regional origins, age, gender, state of health, diet, and in some cases, how they died.

The researchers were also able to use the size of the skull and traces of where the muscle would have met the bone to build up a picture of her appearance.

Most of the skeletons are Anglo-Saxon, from about 1,500 years ago, but some are Neolithic and more than 4,000 years old.

Eastbourne Borough Council Cabinet Member for Tourism and Leisure, Cllr Carolyn Heaps said: ‘It is very exciting to open the first local history related exhibition in ten years.

‘The exhibition is focused on telling the stories of those that date back to Prehistory, giving an insight into what they may have worked as, what cultures they may have adopted as well as their age and gender.’


The skeleton was first discovered in Beachy Head (pictured) in 1953, and she is thought to have lived around AD245 - the middle of the Roman period in Britain

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2551513/Pictured-The-1-800-year-old-face-Beachy-Head-Lady-revealed-time-thanks-3D-scanning.html


quote:
Who was in the Roman army?


Only men could be in the Roman Army. No women. Every Roman soldier was a Roman citizen. He had to be at least 20 years old. He was not supposed to get married while he was a soldier. Most soldiers in the Roman Empire came from countries outside Italy. There were Roman soldiers from Africa, France, Germany, the Balkans, Spain and the Middle East.

Soldiers had to stay in the army for at least 25 years! Then they could retire, with a pension or a gift of land to farm. Old soldiers often settled down to old age together, in a military town or colonia.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/romans/the_roman_army/


quote:
The main Roman soldiers were called legionaries and they had to be Roman citizens to join. This didn’t mean they had to live in Rome though – many soldiers joined from across the Roman Empire including Africa, Britain, France, Germany, Spain, the Balkans and the Middle East.
https://kidskonnect.com/history/roman-soldiers/


So that's how European history is done on Egyptsearch. "real expert"!

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mena7
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Portrait of a Roman Lady | Chiaramonti Gallery, Vatican. XI 4 (696) H 0.53.5. Trajanic period.

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(c. 100-125 CE) Portrait of a Roman Woman

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portrait bust of Matidia the Younger Marble,Roman,Hadrianic period ca AD 122-128 Metropolitan Museum

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A Roman Marble Portrait Head of a Girl, Flavian or Trajanic, circa A.D. 90-110
1y

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Marble portrait head from a statue of a woman, possibly Marciana Augusta, elder sister of the Emperor Trajan (AD98-117).

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Etruscan dancer (bronze) Museo Archeologico, Florence, Italy

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Etruscan bronze statue of a javelin thrower C.550BC Chiusi British Museum

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Etruscan. Young man, naked except for a shoulder-belt, ca. 400-370 BCE, Mont Falterona, Italy Manufacture: Volci, plain of the Po, Etruria ~ Many of the remains of Etruscan art have been found in repositories for the dead, in which the people were accustomed to inter with the body various articles of metal and clay.
38w

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mena7
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(c. 200-300 CE) Gilt Bronze Bust of a Roman Man (perhaps an emperor)

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mena7
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(c. 200-300 CE) Gilt Bronze Bust of a Roman Man (perhaps an emperor)

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Roman man Fayum portrait

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Roman Statuette of a Lictor, 1st century A.D. Bronze

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Unknown “The Hellenistic Prince” Statue of a prince or dynast without crown, traditionnally thought to be a Seleucid prince, maybe Attalus II of Pergamon. Bronze, Greek artwork of the Hellenistic era, 3rd-2nd centuries BC.| National Museum of Rome, Rome. History of Macedonia the ancient kingdom of Greece

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Bronze Statuette of a Draped Female Figure, perhaps Nyx. Roman Empire (Place created). Date: 1st century B.C.

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A ROMAN FRESCO PANEL CIRCA 2ND-3RD CENTURY A.D.

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mena7
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Head of a Roman man 30 BC

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Flamen (Roman priest) - profile, head of Roman sculpture (marble), 3rd century AD, (Musée du Louvre, Paris).

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Roman, Trajanic Portrait head of a woman, 98–117CE. Bronze with silver inlay.

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Terracotta statue of a young woman, late 4th-early 3rd century BCE. Etruscan.

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Bronze female figure Cretan Late Minoan I 1600-1450 BCE Metropolitan Museum

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CIRCA 3RD-2ND CENTURY B.C. With lidded articulated eyes and elaborately coiffed hair, centre- parted and falling into ringlets on either side, wearing large inverted pyramidal earrings and a necklace of large pendants decorated with relief figures of various heroes and deities, a mantle pulled up over the back of her head, preserving traces of red, pink and yellow pigment

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Goddess Diana,Terracotta statue - Diana is showing hunter, form ancient Etruscan culture from İtaly, circa 2nd-1st c. BCE

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Etruscan Diodoros

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GODDESS WITH CHILD (LATONA), ETRUSCAN. Etruscan, Late-Archaic, 510–500 BC…

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Limestone statue of Artemis Bendis | Cypriot | Hellenistic | The Met

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African Head on a Greek Coin, ca. 450 BCE

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Black Roman

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Black Roman, 1st/2nd Century AD, Marble

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A LATE HELLENISTIC OR ROMAN BRONZE HEAD OF A BLACK ROMAN CIRCA 1ST CENTURY B.C.-1ST CENTURY A.D.

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medievalpoc: Ancient Art Week! Vase (Balsamarium) in the Form of the Head of an Egyptian Youth Alexandrian (c. 2nd Century B.C.E.) Bronze, 7.2. cm. Museo Archeologico, Firenze. The Image of the Black in Western Art

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ust of a Lady of Ampuriae, Iberia (now Spain) Bronze, circa 100 AD

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Necrópolis de los Villares Detalle de Guerrero a Caballo (s. V ane). Rostro arcaico, con ojos almendrados delimitados por párpados finos. Peinado ondulado. Boca pequeña pero de labios carnosos. El cinturón ancho, la camisa en "V" y los correajes, habituales en las representaciones de guerreros ibéricos. Museo de Albacete.

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This marvellous bust is one of the very few documents of an actual Black person from Greek and Roman antiquity.

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Lucius Septimius Severus (145 - 211) an Ancient Roman soldier stationed in Egypt in the 1st century BC. Serverus was born in Leptis Magna in the province of Africa in and was Roman Emporer from 193 to 211.

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the lioness,
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quote:
Originally posted by mena7:


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Lucius Septimius Severus (145 - 211) an Ancient Roman soldier stationed in Egypt in the 1st century BC. Serverus was born in Leptis Magna in the province of Africa in and was Roman Emporer from 193 to 211. [/QB]

^ This is not Septimius Severus

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http://medievalpoc.tumblr.com/post/67763726030/ancient-art-week-black-youth-with-pierced-ears

Black Youth with Pierced Ears

Hellenistic

Marble, 26 cm.

Museo Nazionale Romano, Rome.

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mena7
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Thank you for the correction Lioness I dont know why the poster identify this Black Roman as Roman Emperor Septimius Severus.

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Emperor Carinus, Roman bust (marble), 3rd century AD, (Centrale Montemartini, Rome)

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Emperor Caracalla, Roman bust (marble), 3rd century AD, (Musée du Louvre, Paris)...granted citizenship to all inhabitants of the roman empire,2nd Romano-african emperor

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Bust of a young lady contempory of Hadrian, Roman , ca 120 A.D. marble.

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A ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF A WOMAN FLAVIAN PERIOD, CIRCA 75-90 A.D.

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Portrait head of an elderly man, Roman Late 1st c. BC–early 1st c. AB, marble The cheeks are sunken and haggard in the old man’s face, which is furrowed with deep wrinkles. Although it is a naturalistic portrayal of this stage in life, it manifests neither decrepitude nor frailty, but radiates resilience and ascetic toughness

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Notable man, Roman bust (marble), 1st century BC,

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mena7
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Roman mosaic depicting Rome founders twin Gemini Romulus and Remus as having black heads, wearing orange clothes while suckling a black she wolf. To be fair there are other mosaics showing Romulus and Remus to be Brown and White people.I first saw that mosaic in the National Geographic magazine special issue The Most Influential Figures of the Ancient World.

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Mosaic depicting the She-wolf with Romulus and Remus, from Aldborough, about 300-400 AD, Leeds City Museum

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mosaic with a wolf suckling twins ma arrat al nu man syria https pbs twimg com media b47mipuimaa w0w jpg large

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Emperor Hadrian bust with Black God Bes on his armor.

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quote:
Originally posted by mena7:


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Emperor Hadrian bust with Black God Bes on his armor. [/QB]

How do you know this is Bes?
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Legendary founders of Rome, Romulus and Remus, with their wolf foster mother, bronze sculpture

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Roman mosaic depicting the she-wolf, lying down, with Romulus & Remus.

 -

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Modern Romulus and Remus mosaic Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II

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God Bes with his tongue out

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Lioness you can see the tongue out similarity between the Egyptian God Bes and the Roman flat nose God.

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the lioness,
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It might be Bes but I tried to find a reference and couldn't find one.
I don't know if the tongue out is enough to prove it.
Does Bes appear in some other Roman art?
The head above has wavy hair. I don't know who its supposed to be.
There are simialr sculptures of Hadrain where the head on the chest plate is Medusa


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Fragments of an Archaic statue of
Gorgon Medusa, from the old Athena
Temple of the Athens Acropolis.
Pentelic marble.

Acropolis Museum, Athens.
Inv. No. Acr. 701.


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The figure of the Gorgon Medusa, or just her head (the Gorgoneion), on a
billonstatere from Lesbos.
Circa 500 BC.

Altes Museum, Berlin.


There are several versions of myths concerning the Gorgons, related by ancient authors. According to Hesiod's Theogony (Shield of Heracles), there were three gorgon sisters, daughters of the chthonic sea deities Phorkys and Keto: Stheno (the mighty), Euryale (the far-springer) and Medusa (the queen, or guardian, protectress), who was mortal.


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Winged head of Medusa on the shield of the "Varvakeion Athena"
statuette. From Athens, 3rd century AD

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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by mena7:
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God Bes with his tongue out

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Lioness you can see the tongue out similarity between the Egyptian God Bes and the Roman flat nose God.

This is not strange, considering the Roman empire had ruled over Egypt for a considerable time. Mainly for economical reasons. So the influence is logical.

quote:
God Bes as a Roman soldier 30 BC-200 AD

This unusual terra-cotta figurine represents the Egyptian god Bes as a Roman soldier, 30 BC - 200 AD.

“In the Roman period, Bes was perhaps adopted as a military god since he was often portrayed in the costume of a legionary brandishing a sword” (Shaw & Nicholson 1995:54).


Bibliography (for this item)

Khalil, Hassan M.
1976 Preliminary Studies on the Sanusret Collection. Manuscript, Musée l’Egypte et le Monde Antique, Monaco-Ville, Monaco. ([III], 345)

Shaw, Ian, and Paul Nicholson
1995 The Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. British Museum Press, London, United Kingdom. (54)


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http://www.virtual-egyptian-museum.org/Collection/FullVisit/Collection.FullVisit-JFR.html?../Content/POT.LL.00403.html&0
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Bes is depicted with a beard, is male and sometimes as a baboon
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Acropolis warrior Bronze head. Severe Style, 490-480 BCE. From the Athenian Acropolis. National Archaeological Museum Athens, Greece

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quote:
This book contains convincing evidence and persuasive arguments to cause a stir among historians - Egyptologists in particular - as it will expose archaeological findings excavated in an area that has never been thought to have historical significance. This is no place other than Hargeisa, the capital of Somaliland, and surrounding areas. While the ground-breaking information contained in this book is hoped to bring the long standing argument on the location of the mysterious Land of Punt almost to a close, it will also shed a new light on the race controversy surrounding ancient Egyptian
--Ahmed Ibrahim Awale

The Mystery of the Land of Punt Unravelled (2015)


quote:

Baboon mummy analysis reveals Eritrea and Ethiopia as location of land of Punt


Analysis of mummified baboons in the British Museum has revealed the location of the land of Punt as the area between Ethiopia and Eritrea. To the Egyptians, Punt was a place of fragrances, giraffes, electrum and other exotic goods, and was sometimes referred to as Ta-netjer, or 'God’s land'.

There are several ancient Egyptian texts that record trade voyages to the Land of Punt, dating up until the end of the New Kingdom, 3,000 years ago. But until now scholars did not know where Punt was. Ancient texts offer only vague allusions to its location and no 'Puntite' civilization has been discovered. Somalia, Ethiopia, Yemen and even Mozambique have all been offered as possible locations.

However, it appears that the search for Punt may have come to an end according to new research which claims to prove that it was located in Eritrea/East Ethiopia. Live baboons were among the goods that we know the Egyptians got from Punt. The research team included Professor Salima Ikram from the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, and Professor Nathaniel Dominy and graduate student Gillian Leigh Moritz, both from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

The team studied two baboon mummies in the British Museum. By analysing hairs from these baboons using oxygen isotope analysis, they were able to work out where they originated. Oxygen isotopes act as a 'signal' that can let scientists know where they came from. Depending on the environment an animal lived in, the ratio of different isotopes of oxygen will be different. “Oxygen tends to vary as a function of rainfall and the water composition of plants and seed,” said Professor Nathaniel Dominy of UC Santa Cruz.

Only one of the two baboons was suitable for the research – the other had spent time in Thebes as an exotic pet, and so its isotopic data had been distorted. Working on the baboon discovered in the Valley of the Kings, the researchers compared the oxygen isotope values in the ancient baboons to those found in their modern day brethren. Although isotope values in baboons in Somalia, Yemen and Mozambique did not match, those in Eritrea and Eastern Ethiopia were closely matched.

“All of our specimens in Eritrea and a certain number of our specimens from Ethiopia – that are basically due west from Eritrea – those are good matches,” said Professor Dominy.

The team were unable to compare the mummies with baboons in Yemen. However, Professor Dominy reasoned that “We can tell, based on the isotopic maps of the region, that a baboon from Yemen would look an awful lot like a baboon from Somalia isotopically.” As Somalia is definitely not the place of origin for the baboon, this suggests that Yemen is not the place of origin either.

He concluded that “We think Punt is a sort of circumscribed region that includes eastern Ethiopia and all of Eritrea.”

The team also think that they may have discovered the location of the harbour that the Egyptians would have used to export the baboons and other goods back to Egypt. Dominy points to an area just outside the modern city of Massawa: “We have a specimen from that same harbour and that specimen is a very good match to the mummy.”

Next, the team hopes to get the British Museum’s permission to take a pea-sized sample of bone from the baboon mummy and use it strontium isotope testing. This would hopefully confirm Eritrea/Eastern Ethiopia as the baboon’s origin and narrow down its location more specifically.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/history/baboon-mummy-analysis-reveals-eritrea-and-ethiopia-as-location-of-land-of-punt-1954547.html
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mena7
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Roman Period Plaster Funerary Mask of a Woman - Origin: Egypt Circa: 1 st Century AD ...

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Roman Period Plaster Funerary Mask of a Woman - LO.1312

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the lioness,
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^^ more blacks, it seems endless
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LOL Lioness Afrocentric history is my favorite intellectual subject and my favorite hobby. I am never tired at looking at the pictures of Ancient monarchs, priests and Gods.

--------------------
mena

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Lioness those pictures are not only the pictures of Black people in history they are also the picture of artifacts found in the greatest museums in the world.

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

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the lioness,
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quote:
Originally posted by mena7:
Lioness those pictures are not only the pictures of Black people in history they are also the picture of artifacts found in the greatest museums in the world.

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

You got mw on this one. There's no denying his very black looking features
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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by the lioness,:
quote:
Originally posted by mena7:
Lioness those pictures are not only the pictures of Black people in history they are also the picture of artifacts found in the greatest museums in the world.

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

You got mw on this one. There's no denying his very black looking features
LOL What are black looking features?
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Thereal
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Obviously it's super short curly hair shadow black skin,very full lips and a broad nose because that's the features all Africans have and nothing else. ;-)
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the lioness,
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quote:
Originally posted by mena7:
Lioness those pictures are not only the pictures of Black people in history they are also the picture of artifacts found in the greatest museums in the world.

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

Look, mena posted this, this is the Black Romans and Greeks thread.

His features are undeniably East African and he has Black people hair which proves Emperor Vespasian was Black.

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mena7
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Mena: I think the Roman Flavian Dynasty was a Black family dynasty with dark skin and light skin Emperors and Emperesses having wooly hair to curly hair. There is even a coin of Emperess Domitia with braided hair. In the past people taught that only the Severus dynasty was Black because they came from Africa. Black people live in all seven and eight continents in Ancient time. Europe had a large in powerful Black population.

I think the Roman Emperors came from Black, Brown and White elite families. I think Julius Caesar, Nero (Black in Italian), Marcus Aurelius might have been Black consul and Emperors.

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Bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian by Guglielmo De La Plata 1515

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Roman Emperor Vespasian

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Roman Emperor Titus

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Roman Emperor Domitian

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Roman Emperor Titus

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Roman Emperor Titus

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Emperess Domitia, Domitian wife with braided hairstyle

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Roman Emperor Domitian and Empress Domitia

 - Roman Emperor Domitian

The Flavian dynasty was a Roman imperial dynasty, which ruled the Roman Empire between 69 AD and 96 AD, encompassing the reigns of Vespasian (69–79), and his two sons Titus (79–81) and Domitian (81–96). The Flavians rose to power during the civil war of 69, known as the Year of the Four Emperors. After Galba and Otho died in quick succession, Vitellius became emperor in mid 69. His claim to the throne was quickly challenged by legions stationed in the Eastern provinces, who declared their commander Vespasian emperor in his place. The Second Battle of Bedriacum tilted the balance decisively in favour of the Flavian forces, who entered Rome on December 20. The following day, the Roman Senate officially declared Vespasian emperor of the Roman Empire, thus commencing the Flavian dynasty. Although the dynasty proved to be short-lived, several significant historic, economic and military events took place during their reign.

The reign of Titus was struck by multiple natural disasters, the most severe of which was the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79. The surrounding cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum were completely buried under ash and lava. One year later, Rome was struck by fire and a plague. On the military front, the Flavian dynasty witnessed the siege and destruction of Jerusalem by Titus in 70, following the failed Jewish rebellion of 66. Substantial conquests were made in Great Britain under command of Gnaeus Julius Agricola between 77 and 83, while Domitian was unable to procure a decisive victory against King Decebalus in the war against the Dacians. In addition, the Empire strengthened its border defenses by expanding the fortifications along the Limes Germanicus.

The Flavians initiated economic and cultural reforms. Under Vespasian, new taxes were devised to restore the Empire's finances, while Domitian revalued the Roman coinage by increasing its silver content. A massive building programme was enacted to celebrate the ascent of the Flavian dynasty, leaving multiple enduring landmarks in the city of Rome, the most spectacular of which was the Flavian Amphitheatre, better known as the Colosseum.

Flavian rule came to an end on September 18, 96, when Domitian was assassinated. He was succeeded by the longtime Flavian supporter and advisor Marcus Cocceius Nerva, who founded the long-lived Nerva–Antonine dynasty.

Vespasian (69–79)
Main article: Vespasian

Set of three aurei depicting the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. Top to bottom: Vespasian, Titus and Domitian.
Little factual information survives about Vespasian's government during the ten years he was Emperor. Vespasian spent his first year as a ruler in Egypt, during which the administration of the empire was given to Mucianus, aided by Vespasian's son Domitian. Modern historians believe that Vespasian remained there in order to consolidate support from the Egyptians.[33] In mid-70, Vespasian first came to Rome and immediately embarked on a widespread propaganda campaign to consolidate his power and promote the new dynasty. His reign is best known for financial reforms following the demise of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, such as the institution of the tax on urinals, and the numerous military campaigns fought during the 70s. The most significant of these was the First Jewish-Roman War, which ended in the destruction of the city of Jerusalem by Titus. In addition, Vespasian faced several uprisings in Egypt, Gaul and Germania, and reportedly survived several conspiracies against him.[34] Vespasian helped rebuild Rome after the civil war, adding a temple to peace and beginning construction of the Flavian Amphitheatre, better known as the Colosseum.[35] Vespasian died of natural causes on June 23, 79, and was immediately succeeded by his eldest son Titus.[36] The ancient historians that lived through the period such as Tacitus, Suetonius, Josephus and Pliny the Elder speak well of Vespasian while condemning the emperors that came before him.[37]

Titus (79–81)
Main article: Titus
Despite initial concerns over his character, Titus ruled to great acclaim following the death of Vespasian on June 23, 79 and was considered a good emperor by Suetonius and other contemporary historians.[38] In this role he is best known for his public building program in Rome, and completing the construction of the Colosseum in 80,[39] but also for his generosity in relieving the suffering caused by two disasters, the Mount Vesuvius eruption of 79, and the fire of Rome of 80.[40] Titus continued his father's efforts to promote the Flavian dynasty. He revived practice of the imperial cult, deified his father, and laid foundations for what would later become the Temple of Vespasian and Titus, which was finished by Domitian.[41][42] After barely two years in office, Titus unexpectedly died of a fever on September 13, 81, and was deified by the Roman Senate.[43]

Domitian (81–96)
Main article: Domitian
Domitian was declared emperor by the Praetorian Guard the day after Titus' death, commencing a reign which lasted more than fifteen years—longer than any man who had governed Rome since Tiberius. Domitian strengthened the economy by revaluing the Roman coinage,[44] expanded the border defenses of the Empire,[45] and initiated a massive building programme to restore the damaged city of Rome.[46] In Britain, Gnaeus Julius Agricola expanded the Roman Empire as far as modern day Scotland,[47] but in Dacia, Domitian was unable to procure a decisive victory in the war against the Dacians.[48] On September 18, 96, Domitian was assassinated by court officials, and with him the Flavian dynasty came to an end. The same day, he was succeeded by his friend and advisor Nerva, who founded the long-lasting Nervan-Antonian dynasty. Domitian's memory was condemned to oblivion by the Roman Senate, with which he had a notoriously difficult relationship throughout his reign. Senatorial authors such as Tacitus, Pliny the Younger and Suetonius published histories after his death, propagating the view of Domitian as a cruel and paranoid tyrant. Modern history has rejected these views, instead characterising Domitian as a ruthless but efficient autocrat, whose cultural, economic and political programme provided the foundation for the Principate of the peaceful 2nd century. His successors Nerva and Trajan were less restrictive, but in reality their policies differed little from Domitian's.[4

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mena7
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Portrait of a North African Man 300 – 150 B.C. Found in Cyrene, Libya. Bronze and bone The British Museum

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Kouros (so-called “The Peiraeus Apollo”). Bronze. Early 5th cent. BCE, or 530—520 BCE. Athens, Archaeological Museum of Piraeus.

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Painted wooden mummy portrait of an aristocratic young man. Roman Period. 175-200 A.D. | The Barakat Gallery

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Emperor Titus, Roman statue (marble), 1st century AD, (Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples).

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Nice statue of White or Mulato Emperor Augustus
augustus..8/31/2009: On August 12, 2009, archaeologists found the gold-gilded, life-sized head of a horse and a shoe of the emperor – who ruled the Roman Empire between 23 BC and 14 AD – from a stream in what was once the Roman outpost Germania Magna. Experts there have unearthed several bits – including a horse hoof and a decorated chest strap – from the statue among some 20,000 artefacts uncovered at the site in recent years.

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Fondation J.-E Berger-World Art Treasures, Portrait de femme Epoque romaine: 110-120 Hawara Egypt mod

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Marcus Julius Gessius Alexianus -

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Geta CAESAR PVBLIVS SEPTIMIVS GETA AVGVSTUS Reign: 209 AD – December 26, 211 AD Death: December 19, 211 AD Murdered on the orders of Caracalla

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Domitian. Head: Asia Minor, local school, 84-96 CE. Bust: presumably, by Alessandro Vittoria, 16th cent. Marble. Inv. No. 252. Venice, National Archaeological Museum

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the lioness,
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^ The are so many Black Romans

I can't even find and that are white looking !

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mena7
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Lioness I think the Greek and Roman civilizations were civilization that had the original Black people, White people and their children the Brown people that are call today Mulato, Arab, Latino. for me if you are a mulato with Black people blood in a civilization created by Black people century earlier you are a Black person. There is no such thing as a White Hispanic in Ancient time.

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Acropolis Museum - kore votive

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Acropolis Kore, (Ancient Greek Teenager), 530 BCE. She wears a chiton, the lower garment with the wavy folds, under a heavy shawl-like epiblema. On her head is a curved tiara called a stephane. These statues are known for their ornately patterned hair, accessories, and archaic smiles.

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HE "KORE WITH THE EYES OF A SPHINX"_ Votive offering to Athena. Attic work in Parian marble. From the Acropolis of Athens, ca 500 BC. Athens, Acropolis Museum (by Metropolitan Museum Athens)

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ore de Eutidyco (h.490 a.C.), Atenas, Museo de la Acrópolis.

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Dama de Auxerre -Grecia 650 AC Piedra caliza Museo del Louvre. I'm a big Greek mythology/Greek history fan!

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Sarcophagus of a woman named Artemidora, Roman Egypt, 90-100 A.D.

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ancientpeoples: Mummy mask of a woman c. AD 100-120 Roman Egypt (Source: The British Museum)

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Septimius Severus (145-211) - Roman Empire (193-211).

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Caracalla

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Marble portrait of the Emperor Caracalla, the 22nd emperor, originally co-emperor with his brother Geta ... but not for long.

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Marble portrait of Marciana, sister of the emperor Trajan. Period: Hadrianic. Date: ca. A.D. 130–138. Culture: Roman.

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Pompeii - these are facial reconstructions made from the skulls found at the house of Marcus Julius Polybius

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A Roman marble torso of Aphrodite Circa 2nd Century A.D

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Three Graces, Roman marble relief, circa 2nd Century A.D.

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(c. 200-225 CE) Roman Marble Portrait of a Severan Woma

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Gordian III

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Marble head of Athena

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An Egyptian stucco mummy mask of a woman, Roman period, ca. 80-100 A.D.

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Marble head of an African. Roman. Syrian, c. 2nd century A.D. | Seattle Art Museum

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Byzantine Emperor Justinian 1 with braided hair

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Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian 1

 - Romaean Emperor Justinian 1

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Byzantine Emperor Justinian I the great gold Carthage coin were he looks like a Black man with flat nose, big lips and big eyes

Justinian I (/dʒʌˈstɪniən/; Latin: Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus Augustus; Greek: Φλάβιος Πέτρος Σαββάτιος Ἰουστινιανός Flávios Pétros Sabbátios Ioustinianós) (c. 482 – 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church, was a Byzantine (East Roman) emperor from 527 to 565. During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the historical Roman Empire. Justinian's rule constitutes a distinct epoch in the history of the Later Roman empire, and his reign is marked by the ambitious but only partly realized renovatio imperii, or "restoration of the Empire".[3]

Because of his restoration activities, Justinian has sometimes been called the "last Roman" in modern historiography.[4] This ambition was expressed by the partial recovery of the territories of the defunct western Roman empire.[5] His general, Belisarius, swiftly conquered the Vandal kingdom in North Africa. Subsequently Belisarius, Narses, and other generals conquered the Ostrogothic kingdom, restoring Dalmatia, Sicily, Italy, and Rome to the empire after more than half a century of rule by the Ostrogoths. The prefect Liberius reclaimed the south of the Iberian peninsula, establishing the province of Spania. These campaigns re-established Roman control over the western Mediterranean, increasing the Empire's annual revenue by over a million solidi.[6] During his reign Justinian also subdued the Tzani, a people on the east coast of the Black Sea that had never been under Roman rule before.[7]

A still more resonant aspect of his legacy was the uniform rewriting of Roman law, the Corpus Juris Civilis, which is still the basis of civil law in many modern states.[8] His reign also marked a blossoming of Byzantine culture, and his building program yielded such masterpieces as the church of Hagia Sophia. A devastating outbreak of bubonic plague in the early 540s marked the end of an age of splendour.

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Bust of Roman Emperor Diocletian who looks like a Black Emperor

Diocletian (/ˌdaɪ.əˈkliːʃən/; Latin: Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus Augustus), born Diocles (244–312),[3][5] was a Roman emperor from 284 to 305. Born to a family of low status in the Roman province of Dalmatia, Diocletian rose through the ranks of the military to become cavalry commander to the Emperor Carus. After the deaths of Carus and his son Numerian on campaign in Persia, Diocletian was proclaimed emperor. The title was also claimed by Carus' other surviving son, Carinus, but Diocletian defeated him in the Battle of the Margus. Diocletian's reign stabilized the empire and marks the end of the Crisis of the Third Century. He appointed fellow officer Maximian as Augustus, co-emperor, in 286.

Diocletian delegated further on 1 March 293, appointing Galerius and Constantius as Caesars, junior co-emperors. Under this 'tetrarchy', or "rule of four", each emperor would rule over a quarter-division of the empire. Diocletian secured the empire's borders and purged it of all threats to his power. He defeated the Sarmatians and Carpi during several campaigns between 285 and 299, the Alamanni in 288, and usurpers in Egypt between 297 and 298. Galerius, aided by Diocletian, campaigned successfully against Sassanid Persia, the empire's traditional enemy. In 299 he sacked their capital, Ctesiphon. Diocletian led the subsequent negotiations and achieved a lasting and favorable peace.

Diocletian separated and enlarged the empire's civil and military services and reorganized the empire's provincial divisions, establishing the largest and most bureaucratic government in the history of the empire. He established new administrative centres in Nicomedia, Mediolanum, Antioch, and Trier, closer to the empire's frontiers than the traditional capital at Rome had been. Building on third-century trends towards absolutism, he styled himself an autocrat, elevating himself above the empire's masses with imposing forms of court ceremonies and architecture. Bureaucratic and military growth, constant campaigning, and construction projects increased the state's expenditures and necessitated a comprehensive tax reform. From at least 297 on, imperial taxation was standardized, made more equitable, and levied at generally higher rates.

Not all of Diocletian's plans were successful: the Edict on Maximum Prices (301), his attempt to curb inflation via price controls, was counterproductive and quickly ignored. Although effective while he ruled, Diocletian's tetrarchic system collapsed after his abdication under the competing dynastic claims of Maxentius and Constantine, sons of Maximian and Constantius respectively. The Diocletianic Persecution (303–11), the empire's last, largest, and bloodiest official persecution of Christianity, did not destroy the empire's Christian community; indeed, after 324 Christianity became the empire's preferred religion under its first Christian emperor, Constantine.

In spite of these failures and challenges, Diocletian's reforms fundamentally changed the structure of Roman imperial government and helped stabilize the empire economically and militarily, enabling the empire to remain essentially intact for another hundred years despite being near the brink of collapse in Diocletian's youth. Weakened by illness, Diocletian left the imperial office on 1 May 305, and became the first Roman emperor to abdicate the position voluntarily. He lived out his retirement in his palace on the Dalmatian coast, tending to his vegetable gardens. His palace eventually became the core of the modern-day city of Split in Croatia.

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Emperor Maximinus Daia or Daza looks like a Black Emperor

Maximinus II (Latin: Gaius Valerius Galerius Maximinus Daia Augustus; 20 November c. 270 – July or August 313), also known as Maximinus Daia or Maximinus Daza, was Roman Emperor from 308 to 313. He became embroiled in the Civil wars of the Tetrarchy between rival claimants for control of the empire, in which he was defeated by Licinius. A committed pagan, he engaged in one of the last persecutions of Christians.

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Black or Brown Roman Emperor Constantine founder of the city of Constantinople, the Eastern Roman Empire and modern European Christianity

Constantine the Great (Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus;[2] Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD[1] – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine (in the Orthodox Church as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles),[3] was a Roman Emperor from 306 to 337 AD. Constantine was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman army officer, and his consort Helena. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under the emperors Diocletian and Galerius. In 305, Constantius was raised to the rank of Augustus, senior western emperor, and Constantine was recalled west to campaign under his father in Britannia (Britain). Acclaimed as emperor by the army at Eboracum (modern-day York) after his father's death in 306 AD, Constantine emerged victorious in a series of civil wars against the emperors Maxentius and Licinius to become sole ruler of both west and east by 324 AD.

As emperor, Constantine enacted many administrative, financial, social, and military reforms to strengthen the empire. The government was restructured and civil and military authority separated. A new gold coin, the solidus, was introduced to combat inflation. It would become the standard for Byzantine and European currencies for more than a thousand years. The first Roman emperor to claim conversion to Christianity,[notes 4] Constantine played an influential role in the proclamation of the Edict of Milan in 313, which decreed tolerance for Christianity in the empire. He called the First Council of Nicaea in 325, at which the Nicene Creed was professed by Christians. In military matters, the Roman army was reorganised to consist of mobile field units and garrison soldiers capable of countering internal threats and barbarian invasions. Constantine pursued successful campaigns against the tribes on the Roman frontiers—the Franks, the Alamanni, the Goths, and the Sarmatians—even resettling territories abandoned by his predecessors during the Crisis of the Third Century.

The age of Constantine marked a distinct epoch in the history of the Roman Empire.[5] He built a new imperial residence at Byzantium and renamed the city Constantinople after himself (the laudatory epithet of "New Rome" came later, and was never an official title). It would later become the capital of the Empire for over one thousand years; for which reason the later Eastern Empire would come to be known as the Byzantine Empire. His more immediate political legacy was that, in leaving the empire to his sons, he replaced Diocletian's tetrarchy with the principle of dynastic succession. His reputation flourished during the lifetime of his children and centuries after his reign. The medieval church upheld him as a paragon of virtue while secular rulers invoked him as a prototype, a point of reference, and the symbol of imperial legitimacy and identity.[6] Beginning with the Renaissance, there were more critical appraisals of his reign due to the rediscovery of anti-Constantinian sources. Critics portrayed him as a tyrant. Trends in modern and recent scholarship attempted to balance the extremes of previous scholarship.

Constantine is a significant figure in the history of Christianity. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, built on his orders at the purported site of Jesus' tomb in Jerusalem, became the holiest place in Christendom. The Papal claim to temporal power in the High Middle Ages was based on the supposed Donation of Constantine. He is venerated as a saint by Eastern Orthodox, Byzantine Catholics, and Anglicans.

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Beautiful!Fayum mummy portrait.modifay

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Fayum child portrait

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Bust of a young lady contempory of Hadrian, Roman , ca 120 A.D. marble.

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Portrait of a Noblewoman Date between 145 and 155 Medium

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Etruscan bronze statuette of an athlete C.450BC Arezzo. Cabinet des Medailles museum, Paris

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Roman era funerary mask of a woman on display in the Museum

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Etruscan Vulci or Volci is an Etruscan city in the Province of Viterbo, north to Rome, Italy. The Vulci were a tribe or people as well as a city. They were one of the legendary twelve peoples of Etruscan civilization, who formed into the Etruscan League, a confederacy of self-interest.

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Zeus di Ugento -

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Eretria was an Ionian city-state of ancient Greece. The Eretrians were located right across a narrow body of water from Athens and they were…

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Arte Ibérico. Cabeza femenina. Datada entre el 300 y 100 a. C. Forma parte del conjunto del Cerro de los Santos.

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Terracotta figure of a girl seated on a bench, possibly a local copy of a Greek ‘Tanagra’ type figurine, 3rd century BC, from a house in the town area of Naukratis | MFA, Boston

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Terracotta Relief of Skylla-Greek, about 465-435 BC

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Amazing 4,200 yr-old Silver cups with linear-Elamite inscription showing Elamite ladies in Elamite style dress; discovered in Marvdasht, Pars Provinc. circa Late 2200 BC, Elamite - IRAN. (National Museum of Iran) جامهای نقره‌ با نقش بانوی عیلامی،از دوره عیلامی کهن IranologySociety.

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Trumpet with a swelling decorated with a human head; Silver; Iran, Bactrian period (late 3rd–early 2nd millenium BC) | Louvre Museum

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Unknown (Egypt); Male portrait; From 100 until 125 AD; Marble, copper and pietre dure | Louvre Museum

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Limestone funerary bust so called ”The Beauty of Palmyra”, AD 190-210 | Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen

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Woman from Pratica di Mare, Antiquarium. 500-400 BC.

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Etruscan bronze

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GREEK STYLE HEAD OF A SATYR FROM CENTRAL ASIA, WITH INFLUENCE FROM GHANDHARA, CIRCA 200 - 100 BC

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Unknown, Openwork Relief Appliqué of a Bearded Male, Greek (Laconian), 550 - 525 B.C., H: 12.5

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Limestone portrait of a Palmyrene lady called Aha, Daughter of Zabdila, 149 AD | Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen

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The lady Marti, a funerary portrait of a woman from Palmyra, c. 170-190 CE | Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen

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The limestone funerary portrait of Aqma, daughter of Atelena Hajeuja (left) has just appeared on the Emergency Red List of Syrian Cultural Objects at Risk. She is number 9 on this list published by the International Council of Museums. Aqma died some time in the middle of the 2nd century CE and her effigy was placed in the elegant Breiki family tomb in the necropolis. After the tomb was excavated (1958), her portrait was taken along with those of her relatives to the Palmyra Museum.

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Mithridates VI wearing a lion head, 120 BCE- 63 BCE. King of Pontus, centered below the Caspian Sea, was the Hellenistic enemy of Rome. He controlled most of the shores of the Black Sea and its huge resources. In his first war, he conquered all of Asia Minor, where he massacred resident Romans and Italians. He took Greece before Roman legions forced him back, in his 3rd war he was pushed into Crimea where he killed himself.

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Terracotta statuette of a standing woman Period: Classical Date: late 4th–early 3rd century B.C. Culture: Greek, probably Boeotian

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Relief depicting a juggler from the stela of Settimia Spica (stone). Roman, (1st century AD). Museo della Civilta Romana, Rome, Italy

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Italy, Bologna, Monte Acuto Ragazza, Bronze statue depicting female youth praying. Etruscan civilization, 5th century b.C. Artwork-location: Bologna, Museo Civico Archeologico (Archaeological Museum)

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Trebonianus Gallus, Roman Emperor, reigned 251-253, Location TBDo

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Marcus Livius Drusus Salinator (254 BC – ca. 204 BC), the son of Marcus (a member of the gens Livia), was a Roman consul who fought in both the First and the Second Punic Wars most notably during the Battle of the Metaurus. Born in 254 BC, Livius was elected consul of the Roman Republic with Lucius Aemilius Paulus shortly before the Second Illyrian War in 219 BC.

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Julius Caesar, the brilliant Roman general and politician, lived from July 100 B.C.E. until his assassination on March 15, 44 B.C.E.

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A FUNERARY RELIEF OF A PRIEST. Limestone, red paint. Palmyra, mid 2nd cent. CE.

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Lime stone Bust - Palmyra, 50-150CA

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Etruscan Vase, 4th C. BCE. Etruscans were originally black people, but due to the arrival of "whites" to the homeland, interracial marriages soared. Later on, their population multi-racial.

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Terracotta from Palmyra in Syria, 190-210 BC, decorated with rich jewelry.

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Oenochoé en forme de tête de jeune homme, Fin du Ve - début du IVe siècle avant J.-C.; Gabies, Italie; Bronze coulé et incisé, H.: 32 cm | Musée du Louvre

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Portrait de jeune homme, Vers 300 av. J.-C.; Provenance : environs de Fiesole; Bronze, H.: 30 cm | Musée du Louvre

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ate Hellenistic Bronze Head of a Young Man 2 nd-1st BC

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Anda, si es mamá! - Una mamá bloguera: La lactancia materna en el arte | Madre babilonia


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Ancient Greece basket exhibited at Louvre Museum Terracotta

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Co-Emperor Lucius Verus

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Oenochoé en forme de tête de jeune homme, Fin du Ve - début du IVe siècle avant J.-C.; Gabies, Italie; Bronze coulé et incisé, H.: 32 cm | Musée du Louvre

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KORÉ À LA COLOMBE. Grande statuette représentant une koré debout sur une base. Elle est vêtue d'un long chiton couvert d'un himation plissé dont elle saisit un pan de la main gauche; de la main droite, elle tient une colombe à hauteur de la poitrine. Sa coiffure, formée de longues parotides, est ceinte d'un polos. Terre cuite orangée. Art Grec, fin du VIe siècle av. J.-C.

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L'Empereur Gordien III Empereur de 238 - 244 après J.-C. Entre 242 et 244 après J.-C. Gabies Marbre Art romain | Site officiel du musée du Louvre

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A ROMAN BRONZE PLAQUE CIRCA 1ST-2ND CENTURY A.D. | Christie's

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Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, statesman and general, prominent citizen, life-long friend and son-in-law of Augustus, Roman bust (marble), 1st century BC, (Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence).


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ROMAN MONEY 1ST-3RD CE Gold aureus with facing portrait of Postumus (260-269), who led a revolt against Emperor Gallienus and ruled over Britain, Gaul and Spain but never acchieved total control. CM 1864.11-28.141 British Museum, London, Great Britain

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Fulvia Plautilla, wife of Caracalla. Marble. Late 2nd — early 3rd cent. CE. Inv. No. NAM 358. Athens, New Acropolis Museum.

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Greek bronze figure of an African, Hellenistic Period, circa late 2nd-early 1st Century B.C., 10 1/4
+72 boards

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