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Author Topic: A Black European Elite in USA. :George Hume
Clyde Winters
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Mike111 has discussed the role Black Europeans played in the USA, and how the ancestors of many AAs were Black Europeans. A prominent Black European that came to Colonial America was George Hume.

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There is mention of George Hume in , Jacobite Gleanings from State Manuscripts: Short Sketches of Jacobites; the ...
By J. Macbeth Forbes

https://books.google.com/books?id=crULAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

quote:

  • THE HUME FAMILY

    The Hume Family is our tie to nobility. I have charts going back as far as Sir Thomas Hume of
    Hume, eldest son of Sir John Hume. This takes us back to about the year 1000 which is probably
    further than most of us really care to go.
    Sir Thomas Hume was thirteenth in the direct male line from Crinian, Lord of the Isles, who was
    slain in 1045. This line, which is that of the Earls of Dunbar, is given in Paul's Scots Peerage III,
    Page 239.
    A rather extensive History of the Hume Family was put together in 1903 by John Robert Hume
    of St. Louis, Missouri. Most of the early line is extracted from that work.

    The Hume Family home was Wedderburn Castle in Scotland. It was here in Wedderburn that the
    Hume who came to America was born. This brief genealogy begins with George Hume who
    came to America in the early 1700s.

    Our American line went from George Hume to George Hume II to John Hume to Stanton Hume
    who married Sarah Breckenridge. Their daughter, Ann Elizabeth Hume married Lemuel James
    Patterson in St. Louis County, Missouri. This is the connection of the Hume line with my
    mother's Patterson line, and how they became a part of my direct lineage.

    GEORGE HUME

    George Hume was born at Wedderburn Castle in Scotland on May 30, 1698. Together with his
    father, Sir George, and his uncle Francis, he participated in the Jacobite rebellion of 1715.
    The Jacobites were supporters of the Stuart claim to the throne of England after the expulsion of
    James II in 1688. They supported James son, Prince James Francis Edward. When the Stuarts
    were defeated in Battle by the English the Humes were stripped of their power and made to pay
    for supporting the losing side.

    George's uncle, Sir Francis Hume was banished to the colonies in 1715. Sir Francis died a few
    years later. After two years in prison, George Hume was deported to join him in Virginia.
    George's cousin was the Colonial Governor Spottswood in Williamsburgh. Governor Spottswood
    had remained loyal to the Crown and young George Hume was placed under his care.

    George Hume arrived in Virginia in 1721 and in 1723 became a royal surveyor. In 1727-28, he
    laid out the present city of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

    George served as a lieutenant in the Colonial Troops of Spottsylvania County under Captain
    William Bledsoe. He produced his commission in open court and took oath on September 2,
    1729. This service will entitle descendants to membership in the Society of Colonial Dames and
    the Society of Colonial Wars.

    On February 16, 1727 George Hume married Elizabeth Proctor, daughter of George and Mary
    Proctor. Elizabeth was living in Fredericksburg in Spottsylvania County while George was
    establishing his reputation as a surveyor here.

    In 1731 George Hume received his commission as Deputy to the King and with a marriage
    dower of 2,000 acres he and his family took up residence in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
    From the ages of 16 to 18, George Washington studied surveying as an apprentice under George
    Hume in Fredericksburg.
    George, like all the Humes, was an Episcopalian and was a vestryman in St. George's Parish.
    George was King's surveyor for Lord Fairfax from 1743 to 1750 in Orange County, Virginia.
    The latter part of his life was spent in Culpeper where he was surveyor during the 1750s. George

    Hume died in Culpeper which at the time was in Madison County, Virginia in 1760.
    George and Elizabeth Hume had six children: GEORGE HUME JR., Francis, John, William,
    James and Charles Hume. The following is what I know of these children.

See: https://www.billputman.com/Hume.pdf




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C. A. Winters

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the lioness,
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Obviously the George Hume who was shipped from Liverpool in 1745 was not the same George Hume born 1698 who had been living in Virginia since 1721 and died there in 1760


quote:


https://www.ancestry.com/boards/surnames.hume/680/mb.ashx

GEORGE HUME, of Edinburgh, Scotland, born c.1716

George Hume, a 'writer' (or secretary) from Edinburgh, was a supporter of Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite uprising in 1745. He may have been a member of Ogilvy's Regiment. In 1746 he was recorded as being 30 years old, and he was one of 150 Jacobites transported to the Americas in 1747. But the ship was captured by a French privateer, or man-o-war, and the prisoners were all taken to Martinique. What happened to him next? Are you a relative? I’d love to hear from you!




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Clyde Winters
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quote:
Originally posted by the lioness,:
Obviously the George Hume who was shipped from Liverpool in 1745 was not the same George Hume born 1698 who had been living in Virginia since 1721 and died there in 1760


quote:


https://www.ancestry.com/boards/surnames.hume/680/mb.ashx

GEORGE HUME, of Edinburgh, Scotland, born c.1716

George Hume, a 'writer' (or secretary) from Edinburgh, was a supporter of Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite uprising in 1745. He may have been a member of Ogilvy's Regiment. In 1746 he was recorded as being 30 years old, and he was one of 150 Jacobites transported to the Americas in 1747. But the ship was captured by a French privateer, or man-o-war, and the prisoners were all taken to Martinique. What happened to him next? Are you a relative? I’d love to hear from you!




Stop making stuff up . The Jacobite rebellion took place in 1715, not 1745.


GEORGE HUME

George Hume was born at Wedderburn Castle in Scotland on May 30, 1698. Together with his
father, Sir George, and his uncle Francis, he participated in the Jacobite rebellion of 1715.
The Jacobites were supporters of the Stuart claim to the throne of England after the expulsion of
James II in 1688. They supported James son, Prince James Francis Edward. When the Stuarts
were defeated in Battle by the English the Humes were stripped of their power and made to pay
for supporting the losing side.

George's uncle, Sir Francis Hume was banished to the colonies in 1715. Sir Francis died a few
years later. After two years in prison, George Hume was deported to join him in Virginia.
George's cousin was the Colonial Governor Spottswood in Williamsburgh. Governor Spottswood
had remained loyal to the Crown and young George Hume was placed under his care.

George Hume arrived in Virginia in 1721 and in 1723 became a royal surveyor. In 1727-28, he
laid out the present city of Fredericksburg, Virginia.


George served as a lieutenant in the Colonial Troops of Spottsylvania County under Captain
William Bledsoe. He produced his commission in open court and took oath on September 2,
1729. This service will entitle descendants to membership in the Society of Colonial Dames and
the Society of Colonial Wars.

On February 16, 1727 George Hume married Elizabeth Proctor, daughter of George and Mary
Proctor. Elizabeth was living in Fredericksburg in Spottsylvania County while George was
establishing his reputation as a surveyor here.

In 1731 George Hume received his commission as Deputy to the King and with a marriage
dower of 2,000 acres he and his family took up residence in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
From the ages of 16 to 18, George Washington studied surveying as an apprentice under George
Hume in Fredericksburg.

George, like all the Humes, was an Episcopalian and was a vestryman in St. George's Parish.
George was King's surveyor for Lord Fairfax from 1743 to 1750 in Orange County, Virginia.
The latter part of his life was spent in Culpeper where he was surveyor during the 1750s. George

Hume died in Culpeper which at the time was in Madison County, Virginia in 1760.

George and Elizabeth Hume had six children: GEORGE HUME JR., Francis, John, William,
James and Charles Hume. The following is what I know of these children.

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C. A. Winters

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the lioness,
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quote:
Originally posted by Clyde Winters:

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^ Clyde, did you happen to read the top of this document where it mentions the year?


wikipedia:

Jacobite rising of 1745

The Jacobite rising of 1745 "The Year of Charles") was the attempt by Charles Edward Stuart to regain the British throne for the exiled House of Stuart. The rising occurred during the War of the Austrian Succession, when most of the British Army was on the European continent. Charles Edward Stuart, commonly known as "Bonnie Prince Charlie" or "the Young Pretender", sailed to Scotland and raised the Jacobite standard at Glenfinnan in the Scottish Highlands, where he was supported by a gathering of Highland clansmen.

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The Battle of Culloden, oil on canvas, David Morier, 1746.

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Clyde Winters
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My bad

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C. A. Winters

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francesco01
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What's next? Yellow Europeans because they had blonde hair.
The desperate need to find Europeans who resemble Black Africans is truly ridiculous. When will Afro centrist accept that their people were West African slaves who mostly were sold by other African tribes, because it was a common tradition in many West African tribes to enslave the other defeated tribesmen.
Therefore many were already slaves in before they even saw any slave ships.

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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by francesco01:
What's next? Yellow Europeans because they had blonde hair.
The desperate need to find Europeans who resemble Black Africans is truly ridiculous. When will Afro centrist accept that their people were West African slaves who mostly were sold by other African tribes, because it was a common tradition in many West African tribes to enslave the other defeated tribesmen.
Therefore many were already slaves in before they even saw any slave ships.

Your tail end of "delusionalism" is amazing. Have you ever heard of rebellions on Africa shore? I suggest you look into it.


quote:
Slave ships were designed to give the crew vantage points to bring their weaponry to play against the Africans.
Other ships, and men of shore, rallied to the fight against rebellious Africans, and gory defeat was commonplace. Once defeated, African rebels were subjected to a ritual of grisly punishments and execution, all designed to illustrate to survivors (and to Africans watching on neighboring ships) the inevitable fate of defeated rebels.

[…]

Crews Prepared for Resistance

Faced with the permanent threat of African resistance, the crew had to be permanently alert. A piece of wood, a tool, or any physical object carelessly left within a slave’s reach, could become a weapon. Even African children were distrusted by the crew, as they could pass dangerous objects to the men chained below the deck to facilitate escape and revolt.

[…]


—The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

http://slaveryandremembrance.org/articles/article/?id=A0035


It is obvious that you know very little about African history, so I suggest you STFU about it.

Posts: 18871 | From: pAsidaw SIGILLUM SECRETUM | Registered: Nov 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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