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Author Topic: Living Races of Mankind
the lioness,
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here is a book, a link Doug put up

Many great pictures, fully readable online book

Living races of mankind : a popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world (1902)
VOLUME 1

Author: Hutchinson, H. N. (Henry Neville), 1856-1927

http://archive.org/stream/livingracesofman01hutcuoft#page/n7/mode/2up

________________________________

VOLUME 2

http://archive.org/details/livingracesofman02hutcuoft


__________________________________


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Tuareg
 -

 -


 -


 -

 -

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the lioness,
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Malagani, Malawi, Africa
 -

Zande (Niam-Niam) North Central Africa
 -

Congo
 -


 -

Mandalay, Burma
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Fiji, supercool brother with staff
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New Guinea
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New Britain, Near Papua new Guinea
 -

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xyyman
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Great Link.

Doug and Lioness

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mena7
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Lioness and Doug wonderful human geography ebook Living Races of Mankind. I think the books are PDF and kindle downloadable. Those books remind me od JA Rogers Sex and Race books. Great thread. [Smile]
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the lioness,
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check Volume 2 for most of Africa

(also some at end of Vol 1 )

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Tukuler
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This is a book along with THE SECRET MUSEUM OF
MANKIND (link)
that I've always recommended for views
of worldwide dress before Western Europeanization
of the globe.
http://www.egyptsearch.com/forums/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=15;t=004571;p=2#000060
http://www.egyptsearch.com/forums/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=8;t=008327;p=5#000223

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mena7
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Tukuler great human geography pictorial books The Secret Museum of mankind. Can be download but need bzip 2 to open.
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Tukuler
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quote:
Originally posted by the lioness,:


Tuareg
 -

.

This is not to deny there are some Kel men of the above phenotype.

In Ethnographie de l'Algerie, Houdas (French
translator of the Tarikh es~Sudan) says this
man is a Berber of the Rif. He also has an
interesting sketch of an Arab woman and child
from Oran, p.27, which I'd say may possibly be
indicative of African L lineage if such is reported
among Oran Arab matrilineages or else may be
evident in the autosomes and X chromosome.


 -
Table 1. mtDNA Haplogroup percentage frequencies in the Algerian populations.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056775.t001


???Don't know if any of the Bekada reported L is Arab???

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xyyman
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What is the L phenotype?
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the lioness,
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quote:
Originally posted by Tukuler:


In Ethnographie de l'Algerie, Houdas (French
translator of the Tarikh es~Sudan) says this
man is a Berber of the Rif.

Since there are some Tuareg in Algeria and Morroco and Tuareg are described as berbers then there is no contradiction necessari;y
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Tukuler
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Sure there's contradiction.
Riffians aren't Kel.
Kel aren't Riffians.

The man is either from the Med coast (Rif Morocco)
or he's from the Sahara (Hoggar, Air, etc.)

 -

Personally I trust Houdas a scholar on Africa over
Hutchinson who's creds are, well, I don't know what.

Either writer could be correct.
Clues are the clothes and 'do.

Here's a Riffian man w/similar 'do __________ as the man in question.
 -  -
http://www.flickr.com/photos/newmexico51/5098593786/

The often posted img of Riffian pirate El Hadji Taradji looks to have two or three occipital hair locks
like the above two men. 2400 years ago Herodotus could distinguish Libyan ethnies by their 'do.
 -


Below is an Kel Ahaggar (Algeria) 'do.
 -
Notice no occipital lock(s) on this Kel Ohet man.

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the lioness,
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is Kel mentioned in the text relating to the illustartion?
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Tukuler
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Kel is short for Kel Tamasheq, an umbrella
term encompassing all the various "Kels."

As you know the people called Tuareg by outsiders
name themselves a Kel (i.e., people) and I prefer to
use self-determined identity. Search engines will
find this exchange by either Tuareg or Kel, pending
a surfer's native tongue, detouring more traffic to ES.

For a simplified answer to your question just back source the image(s) you want to know about.

For those more interested in identifying residents here are maps placing various "Kels."

 -
 -

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Ish Gebor
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^ agreed.

quote:
Originally posted by the lioness,:
is Kel mentioned in the text relating to the illustartion?

The Kel are widespread, it doesn't make the Kel Rifs.


You are absorbed with facial traits etc... This is why you fail all the time when it comes to African populations.


 -


However, there is a historic relation.

 -


 -


 -


http://www.flickr.com/photos/neilpictures-performers/with/331814742/

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xyyman
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Keep it up bros. I and many newbies are learning a lot...
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mena7
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The Living Rulers of Mankind is another book by Henry Neville Hutchinson.

http://archive.org/details/livingrulersofma00hutc

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the lioness,
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quote:
Originally posted by Tukuler:
[QB] Kel is short for Kel Tamasheq, an umbrella
term encompassing all the various "Kels."

As you know the people called Tuareg by outsiders
name themselves a Kel (i.e., people) and I prefer to
use self-determined identity. Search engines will
find this exchange by either Tuareg or Kel, pending
a surfer's native tongue, detouring more traffic to ES.

For a simplified answer to your question just back source the image(s) you want to know about.

For those more interested in identifying residents here are maps placing various "Kels."


wikipedia on Tuareg/Kel

The name of the Tuareg for themselves is Imuhagh or Imushagh (cognate to northern Berber Imazighen). The term for a Tuareg man is Amajagh (var. Amashegh, Amahagh), the term for a woman Tamajaq (var. Tamasheq, Tamahaq, Timajaghen). The spelling variants given reflect the variety of the Tuareg dialects, but they all reflect the same linguistic root, expressing the notion of "freemen", strictly only referring to the Tuareg "nobility", to the exclusion of the artisan client castes and slaves. Another self-designation of more recent origin is linguistic, Kel Tamasheq or Kel Tamajaq (Neo-Tifinagh ) "Speakers of Tamasheq".
________________________________________


^^^ they say of more recent origin is linguistic, Kel Tamasheq

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Tukuler
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quote:
Tuareg
 - .

This is not to deny there are some Kel men of the above phenotype.

In Ethnographie de l'Algerie, Houdas (French
translator of the Tarikh es~Sudan) says this
man is a Berber of the Rif.

. . . .

Personally I trust Houdas a scholar on Africa over
Hutchinson who's creds are, well, I don't know what.

Either writer could be correct.
Clues are the clothes and 'do.

Ya know what? Hutchinson gets the collar
and I lost me my money betting on Houdas.

Can't find the image online but Briggs'
Living Races of the Sahara Desert has a
photo of an otherwise unidentified
"eastern Tuareg; Fig 54 c, from Biasutti
1955" of nearly the same 'do AND clothed
in plaid w/white bandolier too.

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Tukuler
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quote:
Originally posted by xyyman:
Keep it up bros. I and many newbies are learning a lot...

.

Yeah man, I got so much stored
away from Ish's postings that
I never knew and you taught
me the stupidity of an LGM
Euro refugia pouring into an
Africa that was never icy  -

Old dogs do pickup new tricks.

Always something new to learn
and many are knowledgeable
here so let each one teach one
just beware passive-aggressive
cats who would poison wisdom's
well while caterwauling on what
they know not.

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the lioness,
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___________________________



other photos of Kel Ahaggar. same series


http://chaudron.blogspot.com/2010/09/tuareg-of-hoggar.html

The Tuareg of the Hoggar (mountains S. Algeria)

 -
The tent is always assembled by women, mainly servants. They dig holes in the ground for the stake, then tamp the sand around it. When the stake is in place, the skin is attached by a lace.


 -
Targui of Kel Rela. Arrangement of the veil. Here the top covers the bottom, but there is also a contrary fashion, although quite rare.

 -
A Berber man of Dag Rali tribe.


 -
Girl of Kel Ahnet wearing multiple braids hairstyle. On her chest talismans of Quranic inspiration.

 -
The inside of a tent. The bags are hung on uprights. The young children play on the floor where a thick layer of fine sand was placed.


 -
Hunting with dogs is common among Tuaregs. For this purpose, they employ a North African breed of dog similar to the arab greyhound, called Sloughi. The photograph shows a hunter of éklan caste holding a couple of dogs on a leash and getting ready to track down mouflons.


 -
Stone Circle of ancient origin which is supposed to refer to a solar cult. Photograph taken near Mount Serkout.

 -
Types of headgear worn by men. The hair is braided and pulled back. The veil passes around the forehead, leaving the top uncovered.

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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by the lioness,:
quote:
Originally posted by Tukuler:
[QB] Kel is short for Kel Tamasheq, an umbrella
term encompassing all the various "Kels."

As you know the people called Tuareg by outsiders
name themselves a Kel (i.e., people) and I prefer to
use self-determined identity. Search engines will
find this exchange by either Tuareg or Kel, pending
a surfer's native tongue, detouring more traffic to ES.

For a simplified answer to your question just back source the image(s) you want to know about.

For those more interested in identifying residents here are maps placing various "Kels."


wikipedia on Tuareg/Kel

The name of the Tuareg for themselves is Imuhagh or Imushagh (cognate to northern Berber Imazighen). The term for a Tuareg man is Amajagh (var. Amashegh, Amahagh), the term for a woman Tamajaq (var. Tamasheq, Tamahaq, Timajaghen). The spelling variants given reflect the variety of the Tuareg dialects, but they all reflect the same linguistic root, expressing the notion of "freemen", strictly only referring to the Tuareg "nobility", to the exclusion of the artisan client castes and slaves. Another self-designation of more recent origin is linguistic, Kel Tamasheq or Kel Tamajaq (Neo-Tifinagh ) "Speakers of Tamasheq".
________________________________________


^^^ they say of more recent origin is linguistic, Kel Tamasheq

quote:
Out of the Sahara

By Marguerite Rigoglioso

Over thousands of years the Tuareg people of North and West Africa mastered the Sahara and repelled or controlled outsiders, earning a near-mythic reputation as noble warriors. Today, modernity and geopolitics are proving as formidable as the unforgiving desert. As trucks slowly replace camels for transport, cash displaces camels or other animals as currency, and state governments overpower indigenous structures, the Tuareg face pressures that threaten their way of life.

Among the more than 1 million Tuareg—pastoral nomads, settled farmers and, increasingly, city dwellers—one group stands out for its adaptability to change. They are the inadan, artists and smiths once considered near the bottom rung of Tuareg society. Inadan possess a highly marketable skill: the ancient knowledge of how to fashion jewelry and other handicrafts embellished with intriguing symbols. (See sidebar.) By venturing into global markets and meeting the tastes of new customers, their endurance in a cash economy seems more assured than that of the Tuareg elite.

Thomas K. Seligman, John & Jill Freidenrich Director of Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center since 1991, has been involved with the inadan for more than 30 years. In May, he will bring the fruits of his studies and the work of his Tuareg friends to campus as part of the first major Tuareg art exhibit in the United States.

Seligman, ’65, designed Art of Being Tuareg: Sahara Nomads in a Modern World as a joint project between the Cantor Arts Center and the Fowler Museum at UCLA. The show opened in Los Angeles last October, captivating viewers with the shimmering, colorful and exceptionally crafted earrings, amulets, necklaces, bracelets, handbags and other wares that make up the ever-evolving Tuareg repertoire. These items will be on display at Stanford from May 30 to September 2, along with videos of artists at work in Niger. The gallery will include a boutique-like setting to simulate expensive Western shops where Tuareg products are sold, and a desert-like setting with a goatskin tent and accoutrements of daily life.

“I simply love the people and the rich culture and art from this part of the world,” Seligman says. “I want to turn people on to Africa, not just to break down American stereotypes about the continent but also to share how wonderful a place I think it is.”

The exhibit also helps fulfill the responsibility he feels toward the people he has lived with and studied during the past three decades. “As a researcher and patron, creating a venue such as this is a way I can give back,” he says. “One of the things that has always captivated me about the Tuareg is their quiet graciousness and hospitality. There’s no keeping score, the way Westerners do, but there’s a natural reciprocity that takes place.”

Seligman first met the family whose art is at the heart of the center’s exhibit in 1971. He was researching art and artifacts in West Africa after serving with the Peace Corps as an assistant professor of art at Cuttington College in Liberia. In Agadez, Niger, he was introduced to Saidi Oumba and his wife, Andi Ouhoulou. They came from a long line of respected inadan and were passing on the skills of making silver jewelry, clothing and leatherwork to their children and extended family in rustic, dirt-floor shops.

“I became intrigued by their way of life, and I wanted to know all about how and why they produced art,” says Seligman, who in addition to his BA in political science has a BFA from the San Francisco Academy of Art and an MFA equivalent in painting and art history from the New York School of Visual Arts.

When Seligman returned to the United States in 1971, he quickly became ensconced in the world of museums as deputy director and curator of the arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. He curated major exhibits on pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, Aboriginal Australia, indigenous peoples of North and Central America, and the African continent.

Seligman took numerous (often grant-funded) trips to West Africa. Spending anywhere from two weeks to three months per sojourn, he observed the Oumba/Ouhoulou artisans at work. He watched the children learn to create and sell items, asked questions, took photos, collected fine pieces for museum and private collections, and relaxed over strong tea. He also traveled across parts of the Sahara by camel to experience the wider context of Tuareg culture.

“Being on camels ten to twelve days in a row is rigorous!” he says. “After my first ten-hour day, I just flopped down on the ground and slept. But it’s the only way to get to certain places, and it’s the only real way to get a sense of the rhythm of Tuareg life.”

For Seligman, knowing the Tuareg has meant living like them whenever possible. “When I’m in Niger in the fall during the Muslim festival Ramadan, I fast all day long with them,” he says. “Everyone gets tired and grouchy, and you’re woken up at 4:30 in the morning to eat pasta and meat because you can only eat before sunrise and after sunset. That’s not fun. I will admit, though,” he says with a laugh, “that I’ve been known to sneak off some days for a Coke and a baguette.”

Seligman never set out to do a longitudinal study of how the Oumba/Ouhoulou family members have modified their art and life. “It just happened slowly over time as I kept returning to Africa and being welcomed by Saidi and Andi,” he says.

The Tuareg are sometimes called the “Blue People of the Sahara” because the indigo of their traditional clothing—a color signifying prestige and wealth—rubs off on their skin. Living throughout southern Algeria and Libya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and Burkina Faso, they form part of the larger indigenous African group historians identify as Berbers—and increasingly as Amazigh, a more ancient name meaning “free people.” The idea of freedom is held dear by the Tuareg, who once crossed the desert by caravan unimpeded by national borders. But wave after wave of invasions by Phoenicians, Romans, Arabs and Europeans disrupted the Tuareg lifestyle, forcing them to move further south into the Sahara and beyond, adopt new languages and religions, including Islam, and in many cases abandon indigenous forms of governance.

Seligman describes the creation of national borders, and the passports and bureaucracy and corruption that go with them, as “a kind of harassment for people who have been living in this land for as long as anybody knows. These borders are completely arbitrary to the Tuareg and don’t correspond to their own federational borders or even natural terrain. They’re just lines that Europeans have drawn. They resent it. When harassment and neglect get bad enough, they rebel.”

Since French colonization in the 20th century, control of the Tuareg region has been punctuated by numerous armed uprisings. In the 1990s, small bands of Tuareg skirmished with armed forces in Mali and Niger in an attempt to improve social, economic and political rights. Seligman has known several leaders of the rebellion, including Mano Dayak, who was killed in a plane crash in 1995 en route to a peace conference with representatives of the Niger military. “I’m able to keep doing what I’m doing because I fly under the radar. I don’t have a public political agenda,” says Seligman of his research in a region that has always been politically contested—and is now a zone of U.S. antiterrorism training.

Seligman points out some of the reasons why the inadan were better equipped to cope with change. Because of their work, “the inadan always tended to be more sedentary within the nomadic Tuareg society, staying in camp, because they had to work with fire and needed a workshop.” When droughts and rebellions forced people into towns, which became cities, the inadan became separated from their nomadic noble-class patrons. “At the same time,” Seligman notes, “droughts brought in aid workers, and those people became consumers of Tuareg culture. So the smiths were buying and selling things while the nobles were losing their herds.”

In addition, the inadan were “more likely to send their children to French schools, while the nobles resisted,” Seligman says. “So from the educational and economic standpoints, the smiths are in many ways now better off than the nobles in terms of their ability to be effective in the global arena.”

Seligman may steer clear of politics, but his work might help open doors for the Tuareg by introducing them to Americans. Mohamed Ewangaye, a member of an inadan family and a diplomatic leader of the Tuareg revolutionary move-ment in Niger, is pleased with the attention the exhibition is bringing to Tuareg concerns.

“Although we are Muslim,” he says, “our armed uprisings have nothing to do with Islamic fundamentalism or terrorism. These are nationalist struggles. I think this exhibit is an important beginning for bringing awareness of who we are and what’s really going on. In fact, we are closely allied with Americans in our ideas about the importance of democracy.”

Seligman has kept his studies focused on how the family of Saidi Oumba and Andi Ouhoulou has adapted traditional Tuareg symbols, designs and materials for a growing world market. Like most inadan, the family is no longer nomadic and is actively engaged in exchange relationships with other Africans and non-Africans in the cash economy of Niger. Private buyers and posh shops in Europe and America have pushed them to produce nontraditional objects as chopstick holders and belt buckles.

The exhibition, made possible in part by Diane, ’65, and Karen Christensen, ’82, and Ruth Halperin, ’47, explores such transformations in depth. Also, Tuareg artists from Niger, with the support of Bill, ’42, and Jean Lane, will visit campus for educational programming before the show makes its last stop at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art.

While some may lament the changes that the Western world has wrought on Tuareg art and life, Seligman is more circumspect. “The notion that culture is fixed is false,” he says. “Museums are like mausoleums—our job is to embalm things in a moment in time. But culture is dynamic, and the Tuareg culture in particular has always been responsive to its environment. Are these changes good or bad? I don’t know. What’s more important to me is the fact that the inadan are pushing their designs and making a living. I think this is one way that Tuareg culture will in fact be able to survive in the long term.”

MARGUERITE RIGOGLIOSO is a Bay Area writer who also researches Amazigh culture.

http://alumni.stanford.edu/get/page/magazine/article/?article_id=32518
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Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by xyyman:
Keep it up bros. I and many newbies are learning a lot...

Here is a good source for you to explore,

New book, by Tuareg author Ahmed Kemil

A Nomad in Two Worlds


Ahmed Kemil, a young Tuareg man from northern Niger, has written a deeply personal and sensuous account of growing up as a camel herder in the Sahara. The book is written in English, which will be much appreciated by those who do not read French, since much of the literature on Tuaregs is in French. He writes about the practical concerns of nomads caring for their precious livestock. Tuareg nomads love their camels, and the camels also love their Tuaregs; they are like members of the family. Each camel has a history and a name. Ahmed gives us very detailed insights into the concerns of pastoralists, their ongoing quest for water and pasture, and their understanding of the harsh terrain and the erratic weather. He talks about his joys and his fears, including his experiences in a bush school, dealing with extreme thirst and pain, the ravages of flooding and drought, and his tragic accident at the age of seven. He also talks about the connectivity between camps of nomads, information sharing, and their community interdependency and reciprocity that enables them to survive. The book is filled with personal stories of Ahmed’s life as a nomad, including the second part of the book where he makes comparisons with his experiences in the U.S.

-- Dr. Barbara A. Worley, Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Everyone interested in the Tuareg people should consider buying a copy of this book! Available on Amazon.com as a Kindle edition (you can read it on your computer or iPhone).

Readers do NOT need a Kindle device in order to read a "Kindle" edition - when you buy it, you will see that there are different options for reading it, whether on a Kindle device, your computer, or the Amazon "Cloud." It's easy!

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D6QJ3WQ/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_0otTrb0X4T6KH

http://tuaregcultureandnews.blogspot.nl/2013/06/new-book-by-tuareg-author-ahmed-kemil.html

Posts: 15218 | From: pAsidaw SIGILLUM SECRETUM | Registered: Nov 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ish Gebor
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quote:
Originally posted by xyyman:
Keep it up bros. I and many newbies are learning a lot...

Mohamed Ahamok, a Tuareg author from the In Gall region of northern Niger, has published a new book in English, Tuareg Short Stories.

In this book, Mohamed recounts stories told in his family's nomad camp in the In Gall region of Niger. Some of the stories are traditional tales, and others are stories fashioned by Tuareg storytellers.

Many stories center about the animals found in the Sahara and Sahel -- camels, lions and hyenas. There are stories of beautiful women and kings. Some are moral tales ending in a proverb. You won't want to miss the surprise endings, characteristic of the Tuaregs' unique sense of wit and humor!

The book is an excellent addition to any Tuareg literature collection, and is suitable for children, as well.


 -



http://tuaregcultureandnews.blogspot.nl/2010/02/new-book-by-tuareg-author-mohamed.html

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xyyman
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Will check it out
Posts: 8611 | From: Without data you are just another person with an opinion - Deming | Registered: Jun 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mena7
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In the Living Rulers of Mankind there is nice pictures of Kings, Queens and their palaces. The only black Kings are the kings of Morocco and India.

http://archive.org/details/livingrulersofma00hutc

Posts: 3953 | From: sepedat/sirius | Registered: Jul 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Firewall
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The lioness and others have you seen this test?

quote:

Quote Originally Posted by Richard

I honestly can't say I take any notice whatsoever of what colour someone's skin is. I don't make any connections to anything else based on it.



Shaggy Alfresco
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quote:



You do, whether consciously or subconsciously. Take the Implicit Association Test. I scored a slight automatic preference for white people.

Implicit Association Test

http://implicit.harvard.edu/


Thread: do you consider north indians as white people?

http://www.cricketweb.net/forum/off-topic/37943-do-you-consider-north-indians-white-people-5.html

Posts: 2053 | From: Somewhere | Registered: May 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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