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Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
So it's been a while since I last shared my artwork with this community. Now that Punos_Rey has done such a good job of cleaning it up, I feel more comfortable sharing my creations in this venue.

I'll start with some of my latest stuff:

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This is a portrait of the princess Amenirdis, who was a daughter of King Kashta of Kush. After her brother Piye conquered Egypt, she served as the God's Wife of Amun (the highest rank of priestess) between 714 and 700 BC. She was actually the first of two Kushite high priestesses to have the name Amenirdis, the second one being her niece Shepenupet's own niece.

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This lovely young lady represents the ancient Indus Valley civilization which thrived in the northwestern Indian subcontinent, along the Indus (or Sindhu) River, between 3300 and 1700 BC. Among their achievements are sophisticated systems of irrigation and urban sanitation, a distinctive written script that remains to be deciphered, and possibly the first taming of Asian elephants for labor. The cause of the Indus Valley culture's breakdown in the second millennium BC remain unknown, but it is around this time when another group of people known as the Aryans started pouring into the region from Central Eurasia.

Recent genetic research indicates that modern Indian people are descended from admixture between these incoming Aryans and the subcontinent's aboriginal inhabitants, the latter having the closest genetic affinity to the "Negrito" Andaman Islanders. Of course, it's most likely that it was these pre-Aryan aborigines who erected the Indus Valley civilization and thus laid down the foundations for latter Indian culture.

This girl's design is cobbled together from multiple sources, but one big inspiration was an ancient Indus Valley figurine commonly identified as a female dancer. However, since the original was completely nude, I've added some clothes to my Indus Valley girl so I could show her off to a broader variety of venues. The designs on her necklace's centerpiece are drawn from seals bearing the Indus Valley culture's distinctive script.

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In ancient Greek legends, the Macrobians were a people living somewhere to the far southern reaches of the world, who stood out due to their remarkable longevity (up to 120 years). They were also considered the tallest and most attractive of all human beings, and they apparently had so much gold in their land that they even made their prisoners' chains from gold. Sources disagree on the Macrobians' exact location, with some identifying it with Somalia or India. However, other writers position the Macrobian homeland further west, in the region south of the Pillars of Heracles (also known as the Straits of Gibraltar). For my portrayal I chose this latter interpretation of the Macrobians as a West African people. The markings on this girl's face are based off an African mask representing a female character.

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This is a doodle of an African swordswoman character, with strong Egyptian and Kushite influences in her design (the sword she's carrying is called a khopesh). I wanted to draw a swordswoman like this after seeing the new Wonder Woman movie, but I chose to make her a character of my own creation rather than actually having her be Wonder Woman (though I am aware that, in the comics, Wonder Woman had an African twin sister named Nubia). Drawing racebent versions of established characters can be fun, but in the end you can do so much more with your own characters than someone else's.

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In the ancient Egyptian worldview, Ma'at was a concept representing truth, justice, and order in the universe. It formed the basis of morality that every Egyptian citizen had to follow and every Pharaoh had to uphold. Sometimes the Egyptians would represent Ma'at as a goddess wearing an ostrich feather under her headband. This feather was a symbol of truth against which the hearts of the dead would be weighed on a scale; only if the heart weighed less than the feather could the dead enter the afterlife.

And finally something that I'll link to offsite, since it's NSFW (but not pornographic either):

Poolside Beauty
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
Some more Egyptian stuff:

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This modern-style Egyptian chick is going shopping at the mall with her crocodile-skin purse. Don't worry, it's only faux crocodile skin, but you can't deny faux croc skin would fit particularly well into the Nile Valley setting.

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This young Egyptian beauty, whom no man other than Pharaoh himself may touch, saunters through the palace during a balmy evening. This character is inspired by the "Pharaoh's Mistress" Anck-su-namun from the first two Mummy movies, who was Imhotep's lover and partner-in-crime in his big power grab. In fact, the gold/orange tint you see here (achieved through a lowered-opacity Overlay layer in Clip Studio Paint) is meant to emulate the lighting in the first movie's opening scene. It took trial and error to figure it out and I still don't think I have it right.

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Somewhere in the ancient Middle East, an Egyptian army led by Pharaoh himself has laid siege to a native fortress. The Pharaoh is rallying his troops for battle should the local population hurry out to defend their city from his invading forces.

Drawn on 11x14'' Bristol board paper which I then taped to my wall.

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Hypatia of Alexandria (370-415 AD) was a female philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer who worked and lectured at the University of Alexandria in Roman-controlled Egypt. Despite the gender prejudice that prevailed during her time, she nonetheless won respect as a brilliant academic by her contemporaries as well as later historians. Unfortunately this did not save her from the wrath of fanatical Christian monks who had her dragged by her chariot down the street, stripped naked, beaten to death, and then burned. These same radicals would then proceed to burn down her university and then drive out the city's artists and intellectuals. It was a tragic end for both a woman of Hypatia's intellect and the institution she represented.

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Sketch of an Egyptian woman in a ritual mourning pose. This is based off a wall relief from the New Kingdom tomb of Horemheb in Saqqara (a little to the south of Giza and Cairo), which shows a whole procession of female mourners in this kind of pose. I thought the way they had their dreadlocks bound together in this relief particularly interesting and I wanted to draw it down in my own style.

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An Egyptian princess spends the balmy evening relaxing on some comfortable furniture.

I admit that the background here was an afterthought which I rushed, but I am rather happy with the chick's reclining pose.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
And some prehistoric creatures for a change:

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Something I drew as a commission for a longtime family friend who's redecorating her 12-year-old son's room.

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I think this Tyrannosaurus rex is eyeing you with curiosity now that you've entered his Cretaceous kingdom. You better hope he's uncommonly hospitable for his species (or, if he isn't, you're fast enough to get away in time).

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The saber-toothed cat Smilodon fatalis prowls a forest of giant sequoia trees in prehistoric California. It's not a backdrop you often see in sabertooth art, but since we know that Smilodon populations lived in California, I think it plausible some some might have hunted around the state's famous redwood trees.

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Quetzalcoatlus northropi, a giant pterosaur that grew as big as a small plane, soars above the Late Cretaceous jungles. Scientists think it would have hunted on the ground, using its elongated neck and beak to pick up prey such as small dinosaurs.

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Kaprosuchus saharicus, the so-called "boar-croc", prowls the jungle treetops of Cretaceous Africa around 95 million years ago. Though it was obviously a relative of crocodiles, paleontologists believe Kaprosuchus lived on land rather than the semi-aquatic existence of its modern cousins. On the other hand, the arboreal portrayal I've gone for is strictly my own artist's speculation.

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Baryonyx walkeri, a smaller European cousin of the Spinosaurus, lunches on an Early Cretaceous lizard. I was originally going to make the prey animal a primitive mosasaur, but I think the mosasaurs evolved sometime after the Baryonyx became extinct. But since the mosasaurs were essentially marine lizards, maybe the one being eaten here is among their ancestors?
 
Posted by Tukuler (Member # 19944) on :
 
Never trust a big butt and a smile
_______________ or _______________

harem intrigue will get you killed quick

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And that city seige scene? I'd buy that comic book, yup.

Classic AE Illustrated
The Battle of Megiddo
Brando F Tyrannohotep

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Journey into Mystery with Ausette
Tales of Amami

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Posted by Autshumato (Member # 22722) on :
 
Wow! I love your art man. Perfect.
 
Posted by the lioness, (Member # 17353) on :
 
^ if he only knew, lol
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of love, beauty, and fertility, takes a stroll amidst the fields of Aaru (which was essentially the Egyptian conception of heaven). The staff she's carrying is called a was-scepter, and it's believed to represent power and authority. Both gods and kings could be portrayed as wielding the was-scepter in Egyptian art.

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My interpretation of Ahmanet, the titular antagonist from the recent Mummy reboot with Tom Cruise.

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It's been years since I last did anything with colored pencils. But once upon a time, they were my preferred medium of coloring before I learned how to do it digitally. For old times' sake, I decided to practice using colored pencils on a sketch of the Egyptian Queen Nefertiti. It'll probably never look as clean as my digitally colored works, but it was good for nostalgia.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
Another take on Hathor since I wasn't happy with the last one:
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Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Nephthys (also known as Nebthet) was a protective goddess of the dead, nighttime, and rivers in the ancient Egyptian pantheon. She was also the sister of Isis, the wife of Set, and the mother of the jackal-masked Anubis. After Set murdered Osiris in the famous Egyptian myth of Horus, it was Nephthys who helped Isis recover Osiris's scattered body parts (she was also Isis's nursemaid for the infant Horus). In allusion to her role as protector of the dead, I've given Nephthys some linen mummy wrappings as part of her dress (e.g. her hair-wrap).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a drawing of Sekhmet, the Egyptian goddess of war and violence, which I colored using a new set of colored pencils. Someone suggested that I dip my pencils into water first, and that trick seems to have smoothed out the coloring even though the pencils aren't technically watercolor.

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Tyrannosaurus rex is shedding its old skin. Almost all reptiles must do this periodically, and big dinosaurs like the T. rex would probably not have been exceptional in that regard.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Isis, who is perhaps the most famous of all the Egyptian goddesses, is casting one of her magic spells. According to Egyptian mythology, she apparently got her powers after learning the sun god Ra's "secret name" (since the Egyptians believed learning a person's secret name would allow you to control them magically), but for the most part she would use them for benevolent purposes such as healing and protection. This helped make Isis one of the most popular deities in the whole Egyptian pantheon in ancient times; even the Greeks and Romans would adopt her into their own religions.

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This is my personal interpretation of the mermaid heroine from the famous Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale "The Little Mermaid". Her pose is loosely based on the statue in Denmark named after the character, although the oyster piercings on her tail are from the original fairy tale. What I find most fascinating about the Andersen original is how bittersweet its ending became. In the story's first draft the mermaid simply dissolves into sea foam after a move of self-sacrifice, but in later drafts she becomes a spirit of air who can ascend to heaven after doing good deeds for three centuries. However, I must admit that I never cared for the popular Disney adaptation (I think it was because the sea witch scared me when I was little).

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This is my interpretation of the sea witch from Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale The Little Mermaid. She is the one who transforms the mermaid protagonist into a human being for the price of her voice. Although the sea witch in the original story was portrayed as very sinister in appearance, she wasn't the main antagonist as in the famous Disney adaptation (also, she had no name, much like the original little mermaid herself). My design for her is supposed to have a shark motif, with shark's teeth on her crown and necklace as well as a shark's tail. Even her blood-red hair is an allusion to sharks being drawn towards blood in the water.
 
Posted by Tukuler (Member # 19944) on :
 
I forget what those little hard paper dowels
(yes dowels not towels) are called but you
can dampen then and use them over the
wetted pencil work for an ink wash effect.

But nothing beats your digital colors, fantastic.

More please, and keep up the good work!
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
Here's a digitally colored version of the last Isis picture:
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Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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The ruins of an ancient Egyptian colony lie deep in the jungle, most probably hiding treasures that no white man (or woman) has ever seen...yet.

This was a time-consuming environment to create, of course, but it was worth the effort in my opinion.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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No, Cleopatra (the most infamous and well-known of all the Queens of Egypt) really don't need no introduction.

(Sorry, I was just listening to the new TLC album.)
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This urban babe is flashing a sign to welcome you to her part of the 'hood. I'd eagerly accept her invitation if I were you.

Sexy hip-hop chicks like this can be fun to design because of all the bling and other decor they have on them, not to mention their far-out color schemes.
 
Posted by BlessedbyHorus (Member # 22000) on :
 
Keep up the good work. Also I see black women are your taste. [Smile]
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Yehuecauhceratops mudei was a ceratopsian dinosaur that roamed Mexico around 72 million years ago, during the late Cretaceous period. Though known only from fragmentary remains, these are enough to show it was relatively small, with a length around three meters (or less than ten feet). But I have to say it has one of the most challenging names to spell of any ceratopsian species thus identified.

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This is a quick late-night sketch of an Egyptian-style pagoda. Which is to say, it's what a pagoda would look like if the Egyptians made their own version after seeing the original Asian models.

I find there is something uniquely fascinating about "hybridizing" fusions between different cultures like this. For example, when I was recently playing the game Far Cry 4, it stood out to me how the game's fictional setting of Kyrat mixed Indian, Chinese, and Tibetan influences in its aesthetics (it is supposed to be located somewhere in the Himalayas). Of course, with a concept like an Egyptian pagoda, one would be mixing cultures even further removed from one another since they're on different continents altogether.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This Egyptian girl is strutting her stuff with little care for what any detractors say behind her back. For as the ancient proverb goes, haters gonna hate.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Bastet (or alternatively Ubasti or simply Bast) is the Egyptian goddess best known for her African wildcat motif. She originally started out as a warrior goddess much like the leonine Sekhmet, but over the centuries she softened up into a playful goddess of music, joy, and the family. Her sacred festival, held in the northern Egypt town of Bubastis every year, would attract over seven hundred thousand "pilgrims" who would get themselves drunk on wine---a bit like spring break for today's college students.

When drawing this "about to pounce" pose, I used as my reference a decade-old photo of the model Jessica White, on whom I crushed real hard when I was in high school.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
Drawing and writing aren't my only creative interests. This is a little music track I made using Music Maker Jam:

Temple of Isis
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a simple portrait of an Arab woman in her traditional hijab.

I feel that Arab and other Middle Eastern women could use more respect in today's world. Everyone knows that many Middle Eastern countries don't treat their own female citizens well, but even in the "enlightened" West, people of Middle Eastern heritage often receive the same suspicion, distrust, and alienation that Jews once suffered. It's gotten to the point where businesses in European countries have recently been allowed to ban employees wearing traditional Middle Eastern attire such as the hijab (as ruled by the European Union's Court of Justice). Sometimes I wonder if there is really a form of resurrected antisemitism at work here, especially since Arabs share the same Semitic heritage as the ancient Hebrews. Between the problems in their original homelands and what they experience in the West, I imagine Middle Eastern women (and men) must feel trapped by injustice.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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A white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) trots over a grassy hill within viewing distance of some ancient pyramids. The white rhino is the larger but less aggressive of the two extant rhino species in Africa, the other being the black rhino. Their names notwithstanding, the most distinctive difference between the white and black rhino is not necessarily their but rather the morphology of their lips. White rhinos have wider lips for grazing on grass whereas black rhinos have smaller, pointed lips for browsing leaves.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This Egyptian palace servant is venting to her Hebrew fan-bearing colleague about the daily drudgery of workin' for the man (in this case, the Pharaoh). "Yo, if I gotta drop another fig into Pharaoh's mouth like he some kinda baby, he better invent us some minimum wage! 'Know what I'm sayin'?" (Translated from Egyptian commoner dialect, of course).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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There are few activities more relaxing than drawing a sexy woman resting on the neck of a Brontosaurus excelsus. Though as far as she is concerned, actually resting on the neck on said brontosaur is already pretty relaxing. As long as the dinosaur remains in a good mood itself, of course...
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This huntress is taking a stroll through her neighborhood, with her hunting spear in hand and a machete on her thigh. Hey, if you lived in a jungle where dinosaurs roamed wild, you'd opt for open-carry too.

The dinosaurs in the background are a Triceratops and a generic microraptorine (the flying bird-like one).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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A young Egyptian girl enjoys the natural calm beside the Nile on the bough of a sycamore fig tree. Native to the Nile Valley and the African tropics, the sycamore fig tree (Ficus sycomorus) was a sacred tree to the Egyptians, who referred to it as the "Tree of Life" and would make their coffins out of its wood. Even in modern Egypt, the sycamore fig is associated with the family of Jesus Christ since they sheltered under one after fleeing to Egypt.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Armed with a bone harpoon and flint knife, this prehistoric huntress is wading through a misty tropical swamp in search of her next meal. Things she'll have to watch out for would include crocodiles, giant snakes, schools of carnivorous fish, and (if she's real unlucky) maybe a grumpy spinosaur.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This Egyptian sorceress has devoted her loyalty to Apep, the serpentine embodiment of chaos. Is she a true villain herself, or has she somehow been misled into this service to evil? I will leave that interpretation up to the viewer.
 
Posted by Djehuti (Member # 6698) on :
 
Nice artwork, Brandon.

I'd say you have two things on your mind-- black chicks and dinosaurs! LOL [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Djehuti:
Nice artwork, Brandon.

I'd say you have two things on your mind-- black chicks and dinosaurs! LOL [Big Grin]

That is certainly true!
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Hatshepsut, the mighty Pharaoh of Upper and Lower Egypt, stands with pride as she admires the accomplishments of her ancient civilization. One of the many titles that Pharaohs went by is "Lord of the Two Lands" in reference to the regions of Upper and Lower Egypt (or southern and northern Egypt respectively, since Upper Egypt is further up the Nile's course).

It's been a while since I last drew Hatshepsut, but she is perhaps my favorite Pharaoh in all Egyptian history. Certainly she's the most fun to draw. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Somewhere off the western coast of Africa, a silverback gorilla who has somehow fallen into the water must defend himself against a sadistic pack of bottlenose dolphins. Because dolphins can be nasty bastards (they're known to attack porpoises for reasons we haven't figured out yet).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This mother Tyrannosaurus rex is leading her little son through the Cretaceous forest. For even future kings must follow the lead of their elders.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Deep in a Cretaceous jungle where dinosaurs roam free, this primitive bird is stretching its wings while perched on a mossy tree branch. It's probably one of the Enantiornithes, which thrived throughout the Cretaceous Period before becoming extinct along with all the non-avian dinosaurs.

Mostly I drew this scene to sharpen my skills at drawing jungles some more.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I seem to be going through another "prehistoric warrior babe" phase at the moment. This one's outfit was based on that of Raquel Welch's character in the classic caveman movie "One Million Years BC".
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Another product of my current "prehistoric huntress" artistic phase. Actually, I've been drawing these sorts of characters for years now, but I've been really feeling them the past few days.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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More fun with prehistoric fantasy babes...

Exactly when human ancestors began to use fire remains uncertain, but it probably began with Homo erectus somewhere in Africa around a million years ago. Some paleoanthropologists, most notably Richard Wrangham, believe that the ability to cook with fire allowed humans to consume and digest more of the food (especially meat) they needed to fuel their growing brains---hence humanity's distinctive ingenuity. For whomever it was who first tamed and made fire, we might have to credit them with jump-starting the evolution of who were are.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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The imperialist desire for cheap Third World labor has not gone away. We simply call it "outsourcing" these days.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Apparently Ursula, the sea witch from Disney's The Little Mermaid, has a daughter from Uma. At least that's according to the upcoming film Descendants 2. But looking at the generic pirate costume they've given her, she looks more like a colleague of Captain Jack Sparrow than a daughter of a part-octopus sea witch. So I decided to redesign this Uma character to look more like, well, a sea witch like her mother.

I will say that her theme song, "What's My Name?", is quite catchy though...
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a couple of early Homo sapiens, or anatomically modern humans, representing how the species might have appeared between 300-100,000 years ago. They would have emerged in Africa before dispersing throughout the rest of the habitable world between 100-70,000 years ago. Of course, all humans living today belong to this species, although those humans living outside of Africa appear to carry trace amounts of ancestry assimilated from other hominins (e.g. Neanderthals and Denisovans).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This Paleolithic warrior babe is springing into battle with spear in one hand and knife in the other. It's a prehistoric antecedent to dual-wielding, if you will. I dunno how practical it would be in an actual battle, but at least it looks cool.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my sketchbook doodle of Palaeoloxodon recki, a giant cousin of the African forest elephant which lived throughout Africa between 4 million and 600,000 years ago. With a shoulder height of around 14 feet, it would have been one of the largest elephants that ever lived (its Asian descendant, Palaeoloxodon namadicus, would have grown even bigger). On its backside you can see a few spears sticking out, which probably don't do much to improve this individual's attitude towards humanity.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my personal interpretation of Ba Yek, the protagonist from the upcoming Ubisoft game Assassin's Creed: Origins. As I understand it, he's supposed to be this professional assassin from ancient Egypt around the time of Cleopatra VII. Even though the only Assassin's Creed game I've ever played is the very first one (the one set in the Middle East during the Crusades), I'm looking forward to this newest iteration of the series simply because of the Egyptian setting.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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And now for something completely different...fooling around in Photoshop.
 
Posted by BlessedbyHorus (Member # 22000) on :
 
Nice.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by BlessedbyHorus:
Nice.

Thanks!

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I wanted to practice a "comic book" style of penciling, inking, and coloring with this one. That's why the black lines are thicker on the shaded sides of the character. By the way, the personage depicted is supposed to be the Egyptian Queen Nefertari, the beloved Great Wife of Pharaoh Ramses II.

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Some fun with practicing different facial expressions in my sketchbook...
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is the "pencil sketch" stage for my interpretation of Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur from Marvel Comics. When their comic came out a couple of years back, I remember liking the idea of a female protagonist of color joining forces with a T. rex, but wasn't so crazy about taking Devil Dinosaur out of his native jungle and dropping him into modern times. So for my take on the duo, I decided to make Moon Girl a prehistoric/tribal twentysomething instead of the modern-day nerdy kid portrayed in the comics. Or, this could be her once she gets older and decides to move with Devil back to his original habitat.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
And this is the colored version of Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur, from Marvel Comics:
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Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This woman is either going to swim home with some very large fish sticks, or she'll end up a bite-sized meal for the Megalodon shark (Carcharodon/Carcharocles/Otodus/etc. megalodon) she's facing up against.

I should have probably drawn the Megalodon bigger in comparison to the girl, but perhaps it is a juvenile of the species.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my "Africanized" reinterpretation of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo's famous statue of David. Of course, the biblical David of Israel would have probably looked Middle Eastern (and worn at least a tunic) if he existed at all, but my goal here was to put an African spin on one of the most iconic masterpieces of Western art history.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is another artwork of mine that's supposed to have some political symbolism. It's always been my perception that African and Afro-Diasporan women in our time are confronted with two hurtful, stereotypical images of black womanhood. The first is the ideal that black women can only be beautiful or desirable if they have lighter skin, straightened hair, or otherwise more "European" physical traits. The second is the "Mammy" or "Precious" caricature of black women as overweight, unattractive, and often sassy and loud. Together, the message these images send is that black women must be divided into light-skinned and attractive, or dark-skinned and unattractive. It's as if black women can't be seen as naturally beautiful without emulating the European look in some way. I believe this dichotomy does a lot of damage to black women's self-image, hence the phenomena of skin-bleaching and hair-straightening on the one hand and the disproportionately high obesity rates in the African-American community on the other.

Mind you, the intent behind this is not to hurt the feelings of biracial women, or women of any race who struggle with their weight. Nobody, regardless of skin color or body weight, should be bullied or treated unfairly for their appearance. I only mean to say that black women's image shouldn't be limited to light-skinned beauty in contrast to dark-skinned ugliness.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This soldier from the distant future is the beneficiary of advanced prosthetic technology that has replaced everything she's lost in combat. Because I wanted more practice with futuristic characters.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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What if the Egyptian Queen Nefertiti's distinctive crown was really a special form of headwrap? It may not be that historically likely, but I thought it was a neat enough concept to doodle down in my sketchbook.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
And now for the colored version...

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What if the Egyptian Queen Nefertiti's distinctive "crown" was really a special form of headwrap?

Truthfully, I got the idea after seeing various photos of African and Afro-Diasporan women wearing their headwraps in a style emulating Nefertiti's crown. It made me wonder whether the original crown itself could have been a headwrap. It may not be that historically likely, but I still think it's a cool concept.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a prestigious officer of the Roman imperial army. As you can see, this individual can trace his ancestry to one of the Empire's five provinces on the African continent. However, he could be stationed anywhere in the Empire's vastness, as the skeletal remains of African individuals have been uncovered from Roman colonial sites as far north as Britain.

This is a redrawing of a portrait I did last year. I decided to revisit the subject matter after reading a recent Twitter conversation where a prominent British"alt-right" propagandist (Paul Joseph Watson) was complaining about BBC portrayals of African people living in Roman Britain. Suffice to say the guy got schooled pretty good by people who knew better.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of love and beauty, casts a flirtatious glance as she strolls through the heavenly Field of Reeds. Because when my muse is otherwise on the fritz, I seem to default to portraits of beautiful Egyptian (or other African) ladies.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is the penciled version of my flirty Hathor portrait, which I'm sharing for those who prefer my old-school penciled art to the digitally colored stuff.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a portrait of Carcharodontosaurus saharicus, a cousin of Giganotosaurus which prowled Africa during the middle Cretaceous Period. It would have been a contemporary (and, in my own mind, maybe even a predator) of the giant fish-eating Spinosaurus.

To be honest, I drew this as a way to flex my paleo-art muscle once again. Dinosaurs were my first love, and when I was a kid they used to be the main thing I'd draw, but lately they seem to be taking a backseat to my human characters. I guess it's because while a lot of people out there like dinosaurs, art depicting human characters provokes even stronger reactions, and artists like me always like to get reactions from our viewers. But rest assured, I am never going to give up on dinosaurs.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Isis, the mighty Egyptian goddess, ascends to the sky to cast another one of her magical spells. Will she bless someone who needs her help, or rain destruction upon her enemies?

I wanted her pose to look like a superhero this time. In fact, there was a superhero character based on Isis who got her own show in the 1970's and eventually became part of the DC Comics continuity. Unfortunately (but also predictably), they had to cast a European-American woman to play this African goddess.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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These three goddesses are the Greek Aphrodite, the Egyptian Hathor, and the Norse Freya. Each of them had love and fertility as part of their domains in their respective cultures. Also, this gave me an opportunity to draw a trio of women from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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My three goddesses of love---the Greek Aphrodite, the Egyptian Hathor, and the Norse Freya---now have some color for further beautification!

Picking Aphrodite's skin tone was a bit tough as I wanted her to have a tawny Mediterranean complexion, but adding highlights made it seem paler than it was supposed to be. Also, I added a Norse valknut symbol to Freya's cheek partly to indicate her Norse identity, but also because I think "tribal" face paint looks good on ancient Northern Europeans.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Somewhere in the eastern Sahara between 16-11,000 years ago, this pair of hunter-gatherers is scouting the dunes for food. The language they speak is Proto-Afrasan (or Proto-Afroasiatic), and it will give rise to a entire phylum of languages spoken across northern and eastern Africa as well as the Middle East. Examples of Afrasan languages include ancient Egyptian, Sudanese Beja, Somali, most languages spoken in Ethiopia, and the Berber and Semitic subgroups (the latter having arrived in the Middle East sometime before 7400 BC). The exact origin point of Proto-Afrasan remains unknown, but most likely it is somewhere in northeastern Africa.

A friend of mine* is working on an anthropology/archaeology book about various human population movements in and out of the Sahara during its cycles of climate change, and he and I believe the expansion of Afrasan languages across Africa and into the Middle East represents one of these movements. His project is what inspired this illustration.

* This would be someone on ES BTW.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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"Say you'll remember me
Standing in a nice dress,
Staring at the sunset, babe.
Red lips and rosy cheeks,
Say you'll see me again
Even if it's just in your wildest dreams."
--- Taylor Swift, "Wildest Dreams"

This started out as simply an African woman sitting on her legs, but then I recalled the Taylor Swift song "Wildest Dreams" from a few years back. The music video for that attracted some controversy because it was set in the African bush but somehow hardly featured any black people in it. Whatever your views on that, I thought the song would make for a nice (if ironic) "theme" for this piece.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a quick portrait of Gaius Julius Caesar (100-44 BC), by far the best known of the Roman generals and statesmen. This was the guy who conquered Gaul (now France), romanced Cleopatra before Antony, and eventually got himself assassinated on the Ides of March. It was his great-grandnephew Octavian who became the first proper Emperor of Rome, thereby ending its phase as a Republic.

Although Caesar is supposed to looked middle-aged in my portrait (since that was how he looked in the bust I used as reference), I kept his hair dark because everyone else seems to color it this silvery-white color. I dunno how that convention came to be, since he would have only been in his mid-fifties when he died (so it should have only started to gray, if he was like most dudes).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Cryolophosaurus ellioti was a large theropod dinosaur that stalked Antarctica during the Early Jurassic, around 194 to 188 million years ago. Back then, the continent would have been covered by temperate forests as a result of the warmer global climate. The distinctive pompadour-like crest on Cryolophosaurus's head has inspired the nickname "Elvisaurus" for this dinosaur.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a character concept I designed for a personal fantasy project of mine. The story still needs to be outlined and written, of course, but this is what I currently have for the main antagonist. This dude, named Bao Yen, a fictional Emperor of China (in a sort of mythical past age) who wants revenge against the Egyptians for slaying his father in combat. He is ferociously loyal towards his father's memory and patriotic to an imperialistic extreme, but he has a spoiled mentality of entitlement and looks down upon all "foreign barbarians" (thought to be fair, so did most ancient Chinese).

I believe I have a soft spot for racist, imperialistic villains like this guy. That's probably because they have a lot of historical precedent that makes them frighteningly familiar to us in the real world.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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And now we turn to the heroine of my fantasy project, the warrior princess Nefrusheri of Egypt. She's a fierce, yet fun-loving, young lady who's quite a bit anxious about succeeding her father as Pharaoh, but she wants more than anything to earn his approval and carry on his legacy of strong and protective leadership. When the Emperor of China steals the Staff of Serpents which her father once used to defeat a Chinese invasion, it's up to Nefrusheri to retrieve it.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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While waiting for one of my game-design classes to begin, I did this portrait of the Egyptian "boy Pharaoh" Tutankhamun using my new set of colored pencils. They can be fun to play with, although right now the coloring still looks more uneven than when I do digital colors. I think I am improving in that regard though.

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Tyrannosaurus rex is curious about this little spinning thing that the young mammals have been fidgeting with lately. And I have to say I can totally relate to his feelings here.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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My original character Nefrusheri, an Egyptian warrior princess, practices her martial arts skills with her khopesh sword in hand. I wanted to portray this character in a more dynamic action pose than my last drawing of her, in which she was simply standing.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Han Qiu is another character from my little fantasy project, which I am calling "The Staff of Serpents" for the time being. He leads the Shaolin monks whom the Chinese Emperor Bao Yen sends to steal the enchanted Staff of Serpents from Egypt. Han Qiu doesn't really have his own vendetta against the Egyptians, nor does he approve of the Emperor's vengeful and imperialistic agenda, but his Shaolin training compels him to obey his superiors (since honoring one's master is a major precept in the Shaolin belief system, at least as I understand it). You could say he's a reluctant right-hand man for the bad guy in this story. Oh, and the missing eye and scars on his chest are from a tiger attack he fought off in his youth.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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It's going down between two of the mightiest fighters of all time, Bruce Lee and Tyrannosaurus rex. Need I say more?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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My original character, an Egyptian warrior princess named Nefrusheri, is striking a pin-up pose here. I wanted this to look like something you'd see on the cover of Maxim, Playboy, or some other men's magazine. If such magazines existed in ancient Egyptian times, I'm sure princesses like Nefrusheri would love to pose for them.

I'm still working on the outline for Nefrusheri's story by the way. Right now, the first and third act have been sketched out, but for some reason the second act remains murky (and this isn't the first time that has happened to me).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I made this map for a fantasy project of mine which I am titling "The Staff of Serpents". The story is supposed to be set in a fictional, mythic era of gods, heroes, and sorcery sometime in our world's ancient past. As you can see, the setting's emphasis is on cultures from northeastern Africa and Asia, with the story's two most important civilizations being pharaonic Egypt and imperial China (the plot centers on a conflict between these two powers).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Amset is another original character from my fantasy project "The Staff of Serpents". He's the Egyptian princess Nefrusheri's younger brother, who is studying to became a High Priest of Ra. He's even more rambunctious and prone to trouble than his big sister, but he still loves her with a fierce protectiveness and joins her on her quest to retrieve the Staff of Serpents. Unfortunately he also suffers from xenophobic tendencies; he really doesn't like non-Egyptian men hitting on his sister (originally xenophobia was going to be a character flaw of Nefrusheri's as well, but I felt it made more sense for this character instead).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my take on one of the most infamous scenes from late Egyptian history, namely Cleopatra VII's legendary suicide by snakebite. An 1892 painting by Reginald Butler inspired the composition here, but this moment has been a classic subject of historical illustration for centuries.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Time for another character from my "Staff of Serpents" fantasy project, Pharaoh Heru of Egypt! He is Nefrusheri and Amset's loving dad, but he is constantly frustrated by their not taking their royal responsibilities as seriously as they should. He's particularly worried about Nefrusheri since she is his planned heir to the Egyptian throne. Also, he's the character who once used the Staff of Serpents to defend Egypt from a Chinese invasion around ten years before the events of the man story. The freckles on his face are inspired by the actor Morgan Freeman.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Here is yet another character planned for my fantasy story "The Staff of Serpents". Isokrates is an inventor of Greek descent who lives in Egypt with the Pharaoh's patronage (his parents were mercenary immigrants). He's the prototypical nerdy type, smart and educated but also obsessive, reclusive, and socially awkward. Isokrates also has the hots for Nefrusheri, but her brother Amset doesn't want him or any other foreigners near his sister. Nonetheless, Isokrates joins Nefrusheri's quest to retrieve the Staff of Serpents since they will need his inventor's skills to make the journey.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
"Staff of Serpents" Main Cast
This is a round-up of the main characters from my fantasy story, which I am tentatively titling "The Staff of Serpents". The story takes place in a fictional, mythic age of heroes, monsters, and magic, with the main conflict pitting the empires of ancient Egypt and China against each other. Our protagonist is the Egyptian princess Nefrusheri, who must retrieve her people's sacred Staff of Serpents before the vengeful Chinese Emperor Bao Yen can use it to summon a weapon of mass destruction. Joining her will be her rambunctious brother Amset and the nerdy Greek inventor Isokrates. Can they pry the Staff out of Bao Yen's clutches before it's too late?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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The hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus) is a species of African antelope that roams the dry plains of Africa. They eat mostly grass and travel in herds ranging between twenty to three hundred individuals. Although their range is now restricted to the lands south of the Sahara Desert, in ancient times they were present in the northern parts of the continent as well. They probably would have been one of the several antelope species that Egyptian pharaohs and nobility would have hunted.

In fact, the idea behind this sketch came to mind while I was working on the first scene of my story "The Staff of Serpents", wherein my protagonist Nefrusheri is hunting some hartebeests with her brother.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Having fun with ancient Egyptian chicks in modern-day outfits here...

The word "hotep" means "to be at peace" in ancient Egyptian, but the Egyptians actually would use the phrase "em hotep" (in peace) as a greeting. However, omitting the "em" in the phrase made for better alliteration with "homies".

(And yes, this girl's get-up is based on my earlier character Nefrusheri, from whom she could very well be descended.)
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
And this would be the colored version...
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Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my interpretation of Pharah, the Egyptian character from the Blizzard game Overwatch. I've never actually gotten to play that game since it somehow doesn't seem to be available on Steam, but I've seen so much Pharah fan art when browsing DeviantArt for Egyptian-themed pieces that I wanted to do my own take on the character.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is the titular object of my fantasy story The Staff of Serpents. It's what Bao Yen wants to steal in order to conquer and enslave Egypt, and it's what Nefrusheri must retrieve from his clutches. Originally this was going to be a sorcerer's invention powered by human blood, but then I decided that I preferred the idea of it being a tool of divine origin that only Pharaohs and other rulers could use (since they often had a special connection to the gods in many ancient civilizations).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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My sister recently said that the classic "Venus de Milo" statue is her favorite piece of artwork ever created, which inspired me to do my own "Africanized" interpretation of it (although I had considered doing something like it before). The original statue is from the ancient Greek culture and may depict either the love goddess Aphrodite or the sea goddess Amphitrite (the latter being Poseidon's wife).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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The 1966 song "Devil in a Blue Dress" by Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels is what influenced this piece's color scheme, as well as the background of blue flames. I don't particularly like music from the Sixties, but songs from any period can sometimes be a goldmine for artistic inspiration.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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These soldiers from ancient Egypt and Kush (left and right, respectively) are fighting one another, as these two African kingdoms along the Nile often did. Their cultures were related and influential on one another, but the Egyptians and Kushites seem to have competed with one another with animosity as fierce as that between, say, the Japanese and the Koreans. They even took turns conquering one another. In the end it was Kush that appears to have had the last laugh in this game of war, as it continued to thrive in northern Sudan while Egypt languished under the thumb of Persian, Ptolemaic, and Roman invaders.

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This young babe seems to be absorbed in her music while hiking through the local park. It must make for relaxing exercise, but we can only hope something like a cougar doesn't sneak up on her while she's oblivious.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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It is a truth universally acknowledged that you do not want to be in close proximity to an infuriated Tyrannosaurus rex. The reasons should be self-evident.

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This is something I doodled in my sketchbook while waiting for my Windows 10 to update itself (believe me, the latter process took MUCH more time than my drawing did). It's my original character Nefrusheri simply standing with a spear in hand.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This character's name is Intef, and he's from the same world as my warrior princess heroine Nefrusheri. He's a leading warrior of the Mazoi, a tribe of warlike desert nomads who are ethnically related to Nefrusheri's Egyptian-based people despite their very different culture. I actually do have a short story in the works where Nefrusheri and her brother Amset bump into this guy, but suffice to say it's not a pleasant encounter. Intef's outfit here is drawn from certain Egyptian portrayals of "Nubian" archers wearing red loincloths with green diamonds on their belts.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Hypatia of Alexandria (370-415 AD) was a female philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer who worked and lectured at the University of Alexandria in Roman-controlled Egypt. Despite the gender prejudice that prevailed during her time, she nonetheless won respect as a brilliant academic by her contemporaries as well as later historians. Unfortunately this did not save her from the wrath of fanatical Christian monks who had her dragged by her chariot down the street, stripped naked, beaten to death, and then burned. Some historians believe that Hypatia's death marked a tragic end not only for a woman of her intellect but for the intellectual tradition of science and philosophy which she represented, hence while it has been called "the end of classical antiquity".
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Back in the summer of 2015, I saw on my social media feed a meme that was basically telling women of African heritage to all be "queens" instead of twerking like "hoes". I thought it was a sexist slut-shaming meme and so drew a twerking Nefertiti in response to it. Now that two years have passed, I've redrawn my counter-meme because I felt the message was still relevant and deserved better artwork than what I could produce back then.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This girl, in all her curvaceous beauty, comes straight outta Compton! What happened was that I was practicing a pose of a girl walking straight towards the viewer, and then dressed her up as another cool "gangsta'/urban babe.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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From her perch atop a mossy tree bough, this huntress examines something of interest in the jungle understory below. It might be prey, or maybe a predatory dinosaur she should keep an eye on. Or it might be a curious stranger, such as an explorer from afar, visiting her domain...
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Around 152 million years ago during the Jurassic Period, Seismosaurus hallorum stomps across the North American savannas in the face of the approaching rainy season. Seismosaurus is one of those dinosaurs that I fondly remember from my childhood books, but you never hear about anymore. I believe it is now considered a large species of Diplodocus (in which case its scientific binomial would be Diplodocus hallorum). Which I personally consider a shame since Seismosaurus ("earthquake lizard") is much more evocative in my opinion.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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While waiting for my Unreal Engine class to begin one evening, I passed the time by doodling in my sketchbook an interpretation of the classic Egyptian "Table of Nations". Originally excerpted from a funerary text known as the Book of Gates, charts like this compared the Egyptian people themselves with surrounding nationalities in Africa and the Middle East. Conventionally, the Egyptians would represent themselves as having dark mahogany-brown skin, the people of Kush further up the Nile as almost literally black (much like some South Sudanese today), and the people of northern Libya and the Middle East as having the lighter tan color we associate with the Mediterranean basin today. Unfortunately, this time I couldn't fit a Libyan individual into the picture due to the paper's size constraints, but I would probably color him a shade of tan similar to the Middle Eastern representative.
 
Posted by Elite Diasporan (Member # 22000) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tyrannohotep:
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While waiting for my Unreal Engine class to begin one evening, I passed the time by doodling in my sketchbook an interpretation of the classic Egyptian "Table of Nations". Originally excerpted from a funerary text known as the Book of Gates, charts like this compared the Egyptian people themselves with surrounding nationalities in Africa and the Middle East. Conventionally, the Egyptians would represent themselves as having dark mahogany-brown skin, the people of Kush further up the Nile as almost literally black (much like some South Sudanese today), and the people of northern Libya and the Middle East as having the lighter tan color we associate with the Mediterranean basin today. Unfortunately, this time I couldn't fit a Libyan individual into the picture due to the paper's size constraints, but I would probably color him a shade of tan similar to the Middle Eastern representative.

Looks dope.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
^ Thanks! Have a digitally colored version:
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Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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A lone Deinonychus antirrhopus scouts for prey deep in the jungles of Early Cretaceous North America, circa 110 million years ago. Deinonychus was a larger cousin of Velociraptor that was actually even more influential on the design and portrayal of the Jurassic Park "raptors". Since Deinonychus fossils have been found in groups together with the much larger herbivore Tenontosaurus, some paleontologists have proposed that Deinonychus could have hunted bigger prey in packs (or at least uncoordinated mobs).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Believe it or not, this entire scene began as a simple practice sketch of female back anatomy. But then I had to give the character clothes and a background. I drew my inspiration from the Biblical myth of the Queen of Sheba visiting King Solomon in Jerusalem, as well as the former identification of Sheba with the Great Zimbabwe civilization. Realistically speaking, Sheba was more likely located somewhere in southern Arabia rather than Zimbabwe, but I felt a Queen of Sheba from Zimbabwe would present a stronger cultural contrast with the Middle Eastern setting of Jerusalem than one from Arabia.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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"Baby, you light up my world like nobody else,
The way that you flip your hair gets me overwhelmed.
But when you smile at the ground it ain't hard to tell,
You don't know you're beautiful.

If only you saw what I can see,
You'd understand why I want you so desperately.
Right now I'm looking at you and I can't believe,
You don't know you're beautiful,
That's what makes you beautiful."
--- One Direction, "What Makes You Beautiful"

This one started as a random portrait without any particular theme, but then I thought back to the old One Direction song "What Makes You Beautiful" which is about an attractive but insecure young woman who doesn't realize how alluring she really is. Maybe this is the girl they're singing about?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Sometime after she picked him up from a basket in the Nile, the Egyptian princess from the Book of Exodus's first act is nursing baby Moses with her own milk. We've all seen artistic depictions of the Pharaoh's daughter rescuing Moses from the river, but I'd like to think I am one of the first artists to depict his early childhood after that one moment.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my quick portrait of Ramses II, who is perhaps the most widely known Egyptian Pharaoh after Tutankhamun. He's the one Moses goes up against in many cinematic adaptations of the Book of Exodus. Although often called "Ramses the Great", he was probably more of a prolific propagandist than anything else (his "crowning achievement", the Battle of Kadesh, appears to have been a draw between Egypt and the Hittite Empire). Then again, he was also a prolific breeder, with almost 50 sons and almost 50 daughters through multiple wives (Egyptian pharaohs were invariably polygamous). In Greek, Ramses II was known as Ozymandias, hence the title of the by Percy Shelley which famously says, "Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!"
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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On the left is a portrait of the Egyptian Queen Nefertari (the Great Royal Wife of the Pharaoh Ramses II), and on the right is an Egyptian soldier. For both of these, I wanted to practice pencil drawing with fainter and less sharp outlines around the forms, but it was not an easy thing to accomplish at all. This was especially true for the lighter-colored objects, as you still need to demarcate them against the white paper background. On the other hand, drawing without sharp outlines was easier for the darker forms (e.g. skin and hair) since they already contrast in value from the paper.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This Egyptian princess is taking some time off to enjoy the serenity of one of her palace's hallways. I've always wanted to do a scene like this with an Egyptian character standing in one of the great columned hallways that their civilization is famous for, and I am glad to have finally accomplished one variation of this.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Recently I saw one of my artist friends upload some sketches of a hooded archer character onto Instagram. I thought it was a totally sweet design and wanted to do my own take on that basic archetype. Of course, I had to give my version some Egyptian/Kushite cultural influences with regards to her getup.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This started as a sketchbook doodle while waiting for a meeting with some friends (which ended up being canceled), but then I had to turn it into digital art. It's my original character Nefrusheri, an Egyptian warrior princess, looking behind her with her khopesh in hand. I've been working my way out of another block with her story, and I found that drawing her put me back in the mood for the project.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This started off as a sketch of a hooded archer character that was inspired by the work of another artist. Then I decided to give the character some color, a name, and the rudiments of a backstory.

In my mind, the girl's name is Henutsen, and she is a native of Upper Egypt (that is, southern or upriver Egypt) during the Ptolemaic dynasty (305-30 BC). This was a dynasty of foreign Macedonian origin, and she would be one of many native Egyptians who resented their rule and wanted to take their country back (a bit like how various other African peoples throughout the continent would resist European colonial rule during the 20th century). Her plan is to assassinate the Ptolemaic ruler (undecided on which one yet) to terrify the Greco-Macedonian elite into surrendering control of Egypt back to its indigenous people. But history may not let her get away with it so easily...
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Born to a Greek father and a mother of "obscure origins", Agathoclea earned her historical infamy as the mistress of Ptolemy IV Philopator of Egypt (221-205 BC). It may have been a ruse to grab the throne for her brother Agathocles, for after Ptolemy IV's death (unexplained as far as I can find), they started pilfering from the royal treasure and had his sister-wife Arsinoe III (a potential rival for the throne) murdered. In the end, their crimes did not pay. While her brother died at the hands of his friends, Agathoclea, her sisters, and her mother were dragged into public naked and torn limb from limb by an angry crowd (all their relatives and anyone complicit in Arsinoe's murder were also put to death).

Since her mother's parentage seems to be unknown, I've made my interpretation of Agathoclea a Greek/native Egyptian mix simply because I could. Of course, she could have easily used her "exotic" looks to seduce the debauched Ptolemy IV. Incidentally, there was a native revolution happening further south in Egypt during the end of Ptolemy IV's reign, and it took his successor Ptolemy V Epiphanes to crush it.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
And here's the colored version:

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Born to a Greek father and a mother of "obscure origins", Agathoclea earned her historical infamy as the mistress of Ptolemy IV Philopator of Egypt (221-205 BC). It may have been a ruse to grab the throne for her brother Agathocles, for after Ptolemy IV's death (unexplained as far as I can find), they started pilfering from the royal treasure and had his sister-wife Arsinoe III (a potential rival for the throne) murdered. In the end, their crimes did not pay. While her brother died at the hands of his friends, Agathoclea, her sisters, and her mother were dragged into public naked and torn limb from limb by an angry crowd (all their relatives and anyone complicit in Arsinoe's murder were also put to death).

Since her mother's parentage seems to be unknown, I've made my interpretation of Agathoclea a Greek/native Egyptian mix simply because I could. Of course, she could have easily used her "exotic" looks to seduce the debauched Ptolemy IV. Incidentally, there was a native revolution happening further south in Egypt during the end of Ptolemy IV's reign, and it took his successor Ptolemy V Epiphanes to crush it.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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After recently drawing Agathoclea, the scheming mistress of Ptolemy IV of Egypt (221-205 BC), it was only fair that I do a picture of her having some quality time with the Ptolemaic ruler himself. Since Ptolemy IV had a reputation for drunken revelry and debauchery, I figured that he could have put on quite a bit of excess weight from all the eating that would have gone with that partying (although you wouldn't know it from the more flattering portraits on his coinage). As for what Agathoclea would see in him, my interpretation of their relationship is that she was simply using him to get her brother Agathocles on the throne (and I wouldn't be surprised if they had something to do with his death in 205 BC). He may crave her beauty now, but he better watch out!
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This Triceratops has had a chunk of his frill bitten off by a tyrannosaur, but he is proud to have lived to tell the tale.

If you're wondering what his right foreleg is standing on, it's supposed to be a rock covered with moss-like growth.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This young princess would be destined to rule a kingdom that venerates the sun as their supreme goddess. This one is more of a fantasy design rather than anything historical, although of course there are strong ancient Egyptian/Kushite influences on her jewelry.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
And from elsewhere in the same world...
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This is the sultan of a desert kingdom that worships the moon as their primary god. The influences here are from Middle Eastern cultures such as those of Arabia, Mesopotamia (Iraq), and the Levant (Israel/Palestine, Lebanon, and Syria).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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A Greek immigrant in Egypt enjoys some intimacy with one of the local ladies. I want to say this takes place during the Ptolemaic period, when a dynasty of Macedonian origin ruled Egypt and numerous Greeks settled in the country. But even before this period, there were Greek mercenaries fighting for the Pharaohs at least as early as the 7th century BC. Regardless of the time period it takes place in, please enjoy the steamy make-out scene!
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This man would be a respected priest in a jungle kingdom that feared the wrath of the lightning god above all others. This time, the main cultural influences I drew upon were from the Congo basin of Central Africa, with a little dash of Melanesian on one of his necklaces. Also, the green monster face with gaping jaws on his lower headband is supposed to be a Tyrannosaurus rex, which his people consider sacred to the lightning god.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Osiris (or Ausar) was among the most prominent gods in the Egyptian pantheon. It was he who resided in the underworld to pass judgment on deceased souls after their hearts were weighed against the feather of Ma'at. He was also the husband (and brother) of Isis, the brother of Set, and the father of Horus. In one of the most famous stories from Egyptian myth, Set murdered Osiris by cutting him into pieces, and it was Isis who put him back together while raising Horus to avenge his father (it's most likely a coincidence, but the theme of a son avenging his father's death and taking back his kingdom from an usurping uncle should be familiar to anyone who saw The Lion King as a kid).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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The titanosaurian sauropod Saltasaurus loricatus munches on a liana deep in the Late Cretaceous jungle, circa 70 million years ago. Uncovered in South America, Saltasaurus was small by the standards of the sauropod dinosaurs (only around seven and a half tons in weight), but the osteoderms covering its hide might have still protected it from the predators of its environment.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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A Greek immigrant in Egypt enjoys some intimacy with one of the local ladies. I want to say this takes place during the Ptolemaic period, when a dynasty of Macedonian origin ruled Egypt and numerous Greeks settled in the country. But even before this period, there were Greek mercenaries fighting for the Pharaohs at least as early as the 7th century BC. Regardless of the time period it takes place in, please enjoy the steamy make-out scene! (Now colored!)
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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"My love, you march to war defiant,
May God returneth you triumphant.
And you'll be brave, be strong, be true, my love.
And I'll be waiting for you, forever..."
--- Angela Van Dyck, "Forever" from the Rome: Total War soundtrack

A Greek soldier fighting for the Ptolemaic army receives a goodbye kiss from his native Egyptian lover. She promises him that she'll be waiting for his return, either back home or in the afterlife. This was inspired by the song "Forever" from the soundtrack to the first Rome: Total War game. It's an awfully sweet and romantic song considering the game is about military strategy and conquest, but somehow I find that contrast adds to its beauty (the song "We Are All One" from the Medieval: Total War soundtrack is even better).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
And here is my fooling around with one of the "avatar creators" on the Rinmaru Games site...

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Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Last night I designed two princesses, one Egyptian and the other Kushite, using one of Rinmaru Game's "avatar creator" programs (which are basically like online doll-makers). The logical next step was to draw these two characters in my own style. Of course, the girl on the left is ethnically Egyptian and the one on the right is Kushite.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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A tribal huntress watches with awe (and perhaps some wariness) as these brontosaurs lumber across the savanna. You on the other hand get to admire both the brontos and her booty. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I drew these two designs (a T. rex on the left and the Egyptian Pharaoh Hatshepsut on the right) with the idea that someone out there would use them for tattoos. I have no interest in getting a tattoo myself (I don't like needles pricking my skin), but I'd be more than happy to sell designs like these to interested tattoo artists.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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The city of Kerma, located near the Third Cataract of the Nile in northern Sudan, was the first capital of the kingdom of Kush. It thrived between 2500 and 1500 BC until the Egyptians had it destroyed during their New Kingdom conquest of Kush. Although Kush would resurge as a major power in the Nile Valley after 1000 BC, their capital had moved up the Nile to Napata by this period.

This is a street scene I did for a friend who wants to put together an illustrated book about the Kushite civilization. The big temple in the background is based on one of the structures known as deffufa which have been excavated at Kerma's ruins. I rather like depicting common Kushite people going about their daily lives, since most modern depictions seem to emphasize either their warriors or their kings.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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These two lovebirds are the King and Queen (or Qore and Kentake, respectively) of Kush, a kingdom which once dominated the region of Nubia (now northern Sudan). They shared a common Northeast African cultural heritage with the Egyptians further down the Nile, but the two kingdoms were frequently at each other's throats (they even took turns conquering one another).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This would be my self-portrait, which almost every artist has to do sooner or later. Also, I wanted to poke a little fun at myself here...
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Kentrosaurus aethiopicus was a cousin of the Stegosaurus which lived in Africa during the late Jurassic period, around 155-150 million years ago. It stood out from its North American cousin by having narrower plates, a greater number of spikes on its tail, and then a pair of large spikes sticking out of its shoulder. It was also a lot smaller, weighing little more than a single ton (whereas Stegosaurus could grow between five and seven tons).
 
Posted by mena7 (Member # 20555) on :
 
Beautiful drawings Tyrannohotep.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mena7:
Beautiful drawings Tyrannohotep.

Thanks!

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The Egyptian Queen Nefertari is feeling all miffed now, for whatever reason. Maybe her egoistical hubby Ramses II is getting on her nerves again.

More than anything else, this was an experiment with a different approach to coloring than my usual. I recently saw an art book where the artist apparently did all their coloring under the pencil lines without any inking at all, and it was a look I wanted to try out myself.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This warrior design could come from any of the various civilizations of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. The Aztec and Maya are the most famous of these, but there were numerous others in the region such as the Olmec, Zapotec, Mixtec, and Toltec. However, despite popular belief, the Inca were not a Mesoamerican civilization---their cultural roots lay in the Andes region of South America instead.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Be warned, here be dinosaurs and other savage beasts...really, I felt like doodling a simple jungle environment. In my opinion, the tropical rainforest is the most gorgeous biome on earth.

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This character's name, Zuri, comes from a Swahili word meaning "beautiful". I named her after a friend of mine's adorable baby daughter. Who knows, maybe she'll grow up looking somewhat like this!
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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These Egyptian soldiers are exploring a jungle far away from their native homeland. This could be potentially any rainforest in the world, but most likely it's somewhere in the Congo Basin since that is on the same continent as Egypt (namely Africa).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This would be a Norse warrior from ancient Scandinavia, or what we know today as a Viking. Of course, recent discoveries showing the existence of female Viking warriors played a role in inspiring this little doodle of mine.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Nefrusheri, my warrior princess character, is brushing some dust off her skin after an adventurous day. As fond as I am of her as a character, I keep finding myself in a rut when plotting out her story. Maybe I need to give it a total rehaul. But don't worry, I won't completely give up on her.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Sekhmet, the Egyptian goddess of war and violence, is on another one of her bloodthirsty rampages. Apparently she was so fond of the taste of blood that the sun god Ra, in order to restrain her, got her drunk with beer dyed red to look like blood. Ironically, however, she also had healing as another one of her aspects, so she must have been more than a one-dimensional killer.

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I felt like doing something simple, silly, and cute for a change, so here's fifteen eggs dressed up to resemble different nationalities around the world. Unfortunately I haven't seen too many dark brown eggs around the supermarket, but I had to represent the darker-skinned nationalities of the world somehow.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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As the Egyptian goddess of love and fertility, Hathor sure knows how to slay in a bikini! This time, I made Hathor's swimwear yellow in allusion to another African love divinity, the Yoruba orisha Oshun.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is simply a random character concept of mine, with no story behind her...yet. It's not my most inspired work, but nonetheless I still think she came out rather decent-looking.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Continuing on with the theme of sexy Egyptian goddesses...now it's time for Sekhmet, the goddess of war, to don the bikini! I drew the pose without reference, so the anatomy might be off in places, but I felt it fit her whole lioness motif.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my design for a hypothetical action figure based on the Egyptian warrior goddess Sekhmet. Think of the underlying concept here as a warrior version of Barbie. It came to mind after pondering why you don't see more female action figures out there. You have plenty of female dolls targeted at girls, yes, but not so much toys representing action heroines. I think it's bizarre, personally, since there have got to be plenty of little girls who like action figures too.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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October is coming up soon, so this is my take on one of the classic horror-movie monsters, the revived Egyptian mummy. One of the most famous portrayals of this archetype is the original The Mummy movie from 1932, starring Boris Karloff as the titular character. Although I didn't want my mummy to resemble Karloff exactly, I did want him to have the same distinctively wrinkled look on his face.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This warrior of Germanic heritage is about to unsheathe a sword of considerable dimensions. He could come from any of the various Germanic tribes that called northern Europe their home before migrating to other regions of the subcontinent. Examples of Germanic peoples include the Norse, Anglo-Saxons, Goths, Franks, and Vandals.

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Continuing on with the theme of toy designs, here's a concept for a Tyrannosaurus rex figure with movable jaws and limbs. I think the tail would be bendable. I drew a lot of inspiration from a toy T. rex I got back in the late 90's, which I believe was manufactured by a company called Resaurus. It was truly a beautiful specimen.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Kenga of the Mwela is a main character from another little writing project of mine. She's a tribal huntress whose little sister Azawi has run away into the jungle after a falling out between them, and she and her best friend Sambwe set out to retrieve her. Dangers along the way include dinosaurs and other prehistoric beasts, as well as a rival tribe that sacrifices people to their god of lightning. I admit that I'm not 100% satisfied with the design for the character, but I think the patterns on her snakeskin clothes are a bit interesting.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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In 2013, genetic research led by Iosif Lazaridis found that Neolithic farmers who migrated into Europe from the Middle East after 8,000 years ago owed 44% of their ancestry to a modern human population characterized by little to no Neanderthal admixture (as opposed to the 2-4% found in modern non-African people today). They called this population "Basal Eurasian", but if you think about it, its defining lack of Neanderthal admixture would suggest an origin somewhere in northern Africa (since Neanderthals are not known to have lived anywhere on that continent). Furthermore, the remains of prehistoric Middle Eastern people that have yielded "Basal Eurasian" ancestry in recent years tend to have a mixture of African and native West Eurasian physical traits. This would imply that so-called "Basal Eurasian" actually represents another migration out of Africa into western Eurasia around the end of the last ice age, influencing the ancestry of the Neolithic peoples who would settle in Europe and thereby contribute to modern European ancestry.

Anyway, this is how I imagine a typical "Basal Eurasian" woman might have looked. The gap in her teeth represents the removal of upper incisors common to certain African groups today as well as the pre-Neolithic Natufians of the Middle East.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a breakfast doodle I did of Siats meekerorum, a large meat-eating dinosaur which lived in North America over 98 million years ago. Though known only from fragmentary remains, it appears to have been a distant cousin of Allosaurus and Giganotosaurus. In fact, it was one of the last allosauroid theropods to roam the continent before the tyrannosaurs took over during the later Cretaceous.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a concept for a royal bodyguard from an Egyptian-style fantasy culture, wherein the Pharaohs and their belongings are guarded by skilled female warriors. I doubt the real historical Egyptian Pharaohs had female bodyguards like this, but I took some inspiration from the "Amazon" warriors of Dahomey as well as the fictional Dora Milaje from Wakanda in the Marvel Comics universe.

People who have been following my art for some time may recognize elements of the character's design from my earlier character Nefrusheri, whom I initially conceived as an Egyptian warrior princess. That's intentional on my part, as I was toying with the idea of making Nefrusheri a royal guard of sorts rather than a princess. But those may not be mutually exclusive; maybe Nefrusheri was born into royalty but then signed up for the guard?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my interpretation of Lex Luthor from DC Comics, the corporate ruler of LexCorp and one of Superman's leading nemeses. I always thought he looked like he could potentially be a man of color (maybe it's the vague resemblance he has to Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson), so I gave him some visible Native American ancestry. Not that it's really important to his character, but who's to say Natives can't be bad guys too?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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These guards of the Pharaoh and his palace are as fierce and formidable as they are beautiful. I pity the fool who tries sneaking past them for criminal ends.

On the right is the penciled version of the Pharaoh's guard I showed you guys earlier. I wanted her to have a colleague sharing her shift, so I drew the chick on the left on a separate piece of paper before juxtaposing them together in Photoshop. I'll most likely color her in too.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a concept for a second Pharaoh's Guard character, whom I meant to be a colleague for the first one. Together they would be bodyguards for the Pharaoh in a fantasy version of ancient Egypt. My next step would be juxtaposing the two characters together in some kind of palace scene.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
Link to map
What if modern humans (Homo sapiens) never dispersed out of Africa? This is a map of an "alternate timeline" wherein our species stays entirely within Africa, letting the Neanderthals and Denisovans be in Eurasia. For the most part, the human civilizations that develop in Africa resemble those from our own timeline, but one notable difference is the absence of crops and domesticated animals imported from Eurasia and the Americas. Instead all crops that the Africans grow are native to their own continent (e.g. sorghum, pearl millet, and yams), and they have also domesticated native African animals such as the buffalo, zebra, wildcat, spotted hyena, and donkey. On the other hand, while most of the Neanderthals and Denisovans continue their traditional lifestyle of hunting and gathering in small bands, some Neanderthal populations in the Middle East and Mediterranean Europe had learned agriculture and metalworking from Egyptian humans. These "civilized" Neanderthals have even developed rudimentary city-states like those of our timeline's early Greece and the Fertile Crescent. As for the Denisovans, a few have drifted from insular Southeast Asia into Australia and New Guinea, whereas others might have possibly even migrated across the Bering Strait into the Americas.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a portrait of a dude who's ancient Egyptian (or Kemetic) through one parent and Neanderthal through the other. He comes from an "alternate history" wherein humans all stayed in Africa and Neanderthals continued to roam Europe and the Middle East (the Denisovans get Asia and Australasia). His necklace, which features both an ankh and bird claws, is supposed to display his "biracial" (or would that be bi-species?) heritage.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I colored this sketchbook doodle of a Tyrannosaurus rex portrait with my colored pencils. My reference for the head was a photo of the specimen labeled BHI 3033, better known to the public by its nickname "Stan" (although we don't know for sure what sex it would have been).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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In celebration of October, I've drawn this an Egyptian mummy chick whom I'm nicknaming "Mummique" (it's a mix between "mummy" and the name Monique). I don't have any story planned for her, but I like to imagine that she works as a TV horror host in the tradition of the character Vampira (from Ed Wood's movie Plan 9 from Outer Space).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Remember that Egyptian/Neanderthal dude whose portrait I drew a couple of days ago? Well, these two would be his doting mommy and daddy. I will leave to your imagination how they could have gotten together, but they're from an alternate history where all of humanity stayed within Africa while the Neanderthals got to keep western Eurasia. The Neanderthal dad in this pairing is from one of the Middle Eastern populations, which is why he has tan skin and dark hair instead of the pale skin and red hair of more northerly Neanderthal populations in Europe.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This would be a fictional warrior queen from somewhere in the Congo Basin of Central Africa. Part of the inspiration for the character came from the historically documented Queen Nzinga of Ndongo and Matamba, who lived in what is now Angola and is known for fighting the Portuguese. The wicker shield she's carrying is influenced by those used by warriors from Congolese societies such as the Mangbetu and Zande.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is the colored version of my concept for a Congolese warrior queen. I drew the color scheme of her jewelry and clothing from the flags of two countries in the Congolese region, the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (or D.R.C.). The shield design, on the other hand, is based on the wicker shields used by warriors from Congolese societies such as the Zande/Azande and Mangbetu.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I don't have much to say about this doodle other than that it's an Egyptian woman who's probably of commoner status. It seems that whenever my muse is temporarily on the fritz, Egyptian beauties are one of the subjects I default to. Either that, or it's some kind of dinosaur.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I wasn't originally going to color my last Egyptian portrait, but after taking a second look at her, I thought she was too strikingly beautiful not to color. I think it's something about her eyes that's really alluring.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a speculative portrait of a Triceratops that has ridges on its horns (or rather the keratin covering thereof), much like you would find on the horns of an African antelope. However, I left the tips smooth-sided for better penetration in case a T. rex or some other predator were to attack it.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I drew these two as an exercise in portraying dripping wet hair of different textures. The chick on the left is ancient Egyptian and the one on the right is from the Maya civilization of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a work-in-progress scene which I will color over the weekend. There's a bit of compositional inspiration here from the paleo-artist Doug Henderson, who's known for dinosaur scenes dominated by the foliage rather than the animals themselves.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Tyrannosaurus rex stands at the edge of a glade deep in the rainforest. There's a bit of compositional inspiration here from the paleo-artist Doug Henderson, who's known for dinosaur scenes dominated by the foliage rather than the animals themselves.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Deep in the eastern Egyptian desert, diorite statues of the lion goddess Sekhmet guard an ancient diamond mine.

I'm not actually aware of diamonds ever being found in Egypt. But since the desert hills in the eastern part of the country are made of igneous rock (the kind of rock where diamonds are often found), maybe there are some waiting to be discovered over there?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Did you know that the oldest recorded variation of the Cinderella fairy tale was set in ancient Egypt? According to a brief account by the Greek historian Strabo, an Egyptian courtesan named Rhodopis had one of her sandals carried off by an eagle, which then dropped it in the Pharaoh's lap. Once the Pharaoh's men identified the sandal as hers, Rhodopis became his wife, and he buried her within the third pyramid at Giza. Of course, over the centuries the story would be embellished into a classic underdog tale, which Walt Disney would adapt into the animated movie we all grew up with.

For my interpretation of Cinderella, I combined influences from her original Egyptian background and the Disney design. Her sandals are supposed to be made of glass like in the Disney version.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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For some reason, the word "elegant" was what came to mind when I was doodling this character in my sketchbook.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my interpretation of Menat, an Egyptian fortune teller who is a recently introduced playable character in the game Street Fighter V. She's the second character from the continent of Africa in the entire game series, the first one being Elena from Kenya. I should probably draw Elena next, especially since her design is in severe need of an overhaul (c'mon, Capcom, are people of African descent really that hard to draw for you guys?).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I've come down with a nasty case of the flu in the last couple of days, so I colored my earlier drawing "Elegant" to cheer myself up and kill time. I think she came out even prettier here than in the original pencil drawing.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my portrayal of Sundiata Keita, the warrior prince who founded the empire of Mali in West Africa around 1235 AD. He is the namesake protagonist of the Sundiata Epic, a copy of which I have on my bookshelf.
 
Posted by Elite Diasporan (Member # 22000) on :
 
NICE...
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Elite Diasporan:
NICE...

Thanks!

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This young Semang girl hails from the Southeast Asian island of Singapore sometime in its ancient past. The Semang are a "Negrito" people native to the jungles of peninsular Malaysia. They most probably represent the region's aboriginal inhabitants before the coming of the Malays and other "Mongoloid" Southeast Asians, and I'm confident some of them would have crossed the Straits of Johor to colonize Singapore in very early times. Nowadays, most of Singapore's resident population is made up of Chinese, Indian, and Malay people (along with expats from all over the world), but who knows what remains to be found deep in the island's surviving jungles?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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A jungle huntress stands in front of her house, a temporary shelter made from dead leaves over a framework of branches. Many rainforest-dwelling hunter-gatherer peoples in our own world, such as the Central African Pygmies and the Negritos of Southeast Asia, construct similar shelters for their camps.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I recently went on a trip to the San Diego Zoo, and I thought the Masai giraffes over there were particularly evocative of the Jurassic sauropod dinosaur Brachiosaurus altithorax (the sauropod famously featured in the movie Jurassic Park). Zoos are always great places for inspiring paleo art like this.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is another stab at a pin-up of Sekhmet, the leonine goddess of war in the ancient Egyptian pantheon. This time, I wanted to put more emphasis on her whole lion motif by attaching a lion's mane to her headband. The hieroglyphs in the upper right corner spell out her name in the native Egyptian language.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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It's the month of Halloween, and I felt a voodoo sorceress would fit well into that theme. The skull on her staff is based on that of the Allosaurus, a predatory dinosaur from the Jurassic period.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Ankhesenpepi II was an Egyptian queen of the sixth dynasty (2345-2181 BC) during the Old Kingdom period. She got her start as a consort for the Pharaohs Pepi I and Merenre Nemtyemsaf I, the latter of whom fathered her son Pepi II. When it was time for Pepi II to take the throne in 2278 BC, he was still a little boy, so Ankhesenpepi would have ruled for him as regent until he came of age. A wooden sculpture depicting Ankhesenpepi has recently been unearthed in the area of Saqqara in northern Egypt (near the pyramids of Giza), which is why I did this quick portrait of her.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a map I created in Photoshop to go along with one of my writing projects. It's going to be a prehistoric fantasy with dinosaurs, other prehistoric beasts, and tribal humans at a hunter-gatherer level of subsistence. You could say that it's following the tradition of old caveman movies like One Million Years BC and When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, although there is also a dash of inspiration from more "realistic" prehistoric fiction such as Steven Barnes's Great Sky Woman. The storyline I have planned for it is fundamentally about two sisters, one of whom runs away from their band in pursuit of a new life and the other setting out to bring her back.

I created the textures for the rainforest and savanna terrains on this map myself using photos taken from an aerial point of view.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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The plates on this Stegosaurus ungulatus blaze bright right to reflect its aggravated, defensive mood. I personally like to imagine that Stegosaurus and its cousins could change the color of their plates much as chameleons change their hide color today (it's an idea that evolved from the portrayal of Stegosaurus turning its plates red as a warning display in the old BBC documentary Walking with Dinosaurs).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is concept art for a character named Muambi, who's from a prehistoric fantasy I plan to write in a few days. She is the priestly matriarch of a clan that has settled beside a river, acting as both a spiritual and political leader for her people. As such, Muambi has devoted herself with ferocious zeal to upholding the clan's traditions and punishing any defiance thereof, but she is nonetheless more than happy to aid the needy and welcome newcomers and outcasts into her society.

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This dude, whose name is Chingwe, is another planned character from my prehistoric fantasy story. He's the father of the village priestess-chieftain Muambi and the lead hunter of their riverside village. Chingwe also had a son whom he lost in an altercation with some "forest roamers" (i.e. hunter-gatherers who forage and camp in the jungle), and he has held a xenophobic distrust for those people ever since. The scars on his chest would have been inflicted by an attacking dinosaur in another incident.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Neitetis was a daughter of the Egyptian Pharaoh Wahibre Haaibre (589-570 BC) who married the Persian Shah Cambyses II after her father had died in a coup. According to a (probably fictitious) account by the Greek historian Athenaios of Naucratis, Cambyses had apparently bought into a stereotype that Egyptian women were better sexual performers than others and so requested that the Pharaoh Ahmose II send him one of his daughters as a bride. However, Egyptian Pharaohs normally did not give away their own daughters as wives for foreign kings, so Ahmose sent his predecessor's daughter instead. At first Cambyses was a satisfied customer, but once Neitetis disclosed to him that she was the daughter of Wahibre rather than Ahmose, he invaded and conquered Egypt out of fury at being cheated.

I doubt that's how the Persian invasion of Egypt actually got started, but I think it is an amusing bit of fiction nonetheless, and it gave me the opportunity to mix ancient Persian and Egyptian influences in a portrait.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I wanted to draw something for Halloween tonight, and earlier today I saw a (very unfavorable) review of the recent Mummy reboot by the Nostalgia Critic and the Angry Video Game Nerd. It inspired me to do another "re-imagined" version of Ahmanet, the reboot's titular antagonist. This time, I based her look on the beautiful actress Gabrielle Union (a high-school crush of mine), although I've never been that good at capturing exact likenesses of real people.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This couple represents the earliest speakers of the Proto-Semitic language, which would eventually evolve into all the Semitic languages of the Middle East (e.g. Hebrew, Arabic, Phoenician, and Assyrian). Although Proto-Semitic itself most probably emerged in the Middle East around 3800-3500 BC, it is descended from a larger linguistic phylum known as Afrasan (or Afroasiatic) which first emerged in northeastern Africa >13,000 years ago. Which is to say, Proto-Semitic essentially represents another prehistoric migration of African people into the Middle East (before the locals absorbed them and adopted their language). The sheepskin skirts these Proto-Semitic individuals are wearing in my illustration are inspired by Sumerian descriptions of the nomadic Amorites, an early branch of the Semitic peoples.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Recently I had a dream in which I was playing Age of Empires: Definitive Edition, which was supposed to be released on Oct. 19th this year before a last-minute postponing to sometime in "early 2018". Like most people in the Age of Empires fandom, I was unpleasantly shocked and angered by that news. But I am still excited for the game nonetheless, so I let my dream inspire this fan portrayal of the original game's Broad Swordsman unit. Of course, I couldn't resist a little race- and gender-bending, as the original Age was something of a melanin-challenged sausage fest as far as the unit graphics were concerned (though to be fair, all its playable civilizations were from the Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, and East Asian regions).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is an updated design for Takhaet, a character I created for a short story back in early 2016. She was this veteran Egyptian soldier who started her career fighting for the Pharaoh Amenhotep III, but found herself (and her little niece Nebet) at the receiving end of religious persecution by Amenhotep's "heretical" successor Akhenaten. The story, titled "The Battle Roar of Sekhmet", was about her fighting on behalf of both her traditional religious beliefs and her niece. Among all my characters, I would say Takhaet ranks among my personal favorites since she's the one Egyptian warrior chick whose story I actually finished.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I wanted to make some fan art for the Jurassic Park franchise, but with a naturalistic tone like you would see in more serious paleo art. So here's Blue the raptor (from Jurassic World) giving her talons a little cleaning with her tongue. Even movie monsters must have their mundane moments, after all.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This my sketchy portrait of the Grand Vizier Ay, who is a main antagonist in my old short story "The Battle Roar of Sekhmet". However, he is a real personage from ancient Egyptian history rather than a fictional character. Originally a nobleman from Akhmim in southern Egypt, Ay got his government career started under the Pharaoh Amenhotep III and continued under Akhenaten and Tutankhamun. After Tut's early departure to the afterlife, Ay took his place as Pharaoh in 1323 BC, but seems to have been overthrown by the general Horemheb a mere four years later. Horemheb even went so far as to wipe out as much mention of him as possible from Egyptian records, as if trying to completely erase Ay from the annals of history.

In my story (which takes place in 1350 BC, early in the reign of Akhenaten), I portray Ay as a creepy and aging Vizier in charge of persecuting the traditional Egyptian religion on the behalf of Akhenaten's "Atenist" reforms. And I honestly believe Ay was a creepy guy in real life, too. After Tut's death, his widow Ankhesenamun sent a request to the Hittites to send her a prince for a husband, but the groom just happened to die en route and she ended up marrying Ay (her grandpa) anyway. Either he was ravenous for power and prestige, or he had a serious entitlement mentality with regards to women. Maybe both.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Takhaet, my Egyptian warrior character from over a year ago, now possesses a pair of bars strung together to form a vicious swinging weapon. Today, we call them nunchucks.

In all seriousness, nunchucks (or nunchaku) actually originated from the island of Okinawa which lies south of Japan. They started out as an agricultural tool before being modified into a lethal defensive weapon in the martial arts. But the idea of an Egyptian warrior babe wielding nunchucks was too awesome to pass up.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Nefrusheri, my Egyptian warrior princess, brandishes her dual nunchaku (or nunchucks) as a defensive display of intimidation. Because I wanted to continue on with the theme of Egyptian-style nunchucks.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This woman from ancient Egypt has her hair covered with linen cloth to protect it from the sand and dust of the Sahara. It's similar to an African-American do-rag, and there are Egyptian tomb paintings of men wearing similar headwraps while winnowing grain. And given the ancient Egyptian fondness for styling their hair (especially into braids and dreadlocks), they must have felt a similar need to protect and maintain it. We know people throughout Africa and the African Diaspora (e.g. African-Americans and Afro-Caribbeans) wear wraps of cloth around their hair for that purpose, so maybe the Egyptians did as well?

By the way, if you're seeing weird lines in her skin, those are dents in the sketchbook paper from an earlier drawing. Unfortunately, not all sketchbook paper is equally robust.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my interpretation of Amanra, a character from the game Age of Mythology (a mythological spin-off of Age of Empires). She was an agile warrior princess from Kush who became the single-player campaign's leading lady after appearing in its Egyptian act. Looking back, the casting of a strong and attractive African woman as the leading female character in a game was quite remarkable, considering that diverse representation in games wasn't such a hot topic back when AoM came out in 2002. Unfortunately, I have a hunch that certain critics today would overlook that and fixate on the character being textured with an exposed midriff.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I couldn't resist coloring my earlier portrait, which depicts a woman from ancient Egypt wearing a protective wrap of cloth around her hair. I also added some blue stripes to the cloth to make it look, well, more Egyptian-ish.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Beauty standards may change across time and space, but the human desire to meet them never will.

However, some specific insecurities, such as Ramses's here, may be more timeless than others.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a split portrait of the goddess Isis (or Auset) as she would have been seen in the different cultures that venerated her. On the left is the original Egyptian and Kushite portrayal or her, whereas on the right is the version the Greeks and Romans adopted after incorporating Egypt into their empires. In both cases, the goddess would have been represented in the image of her human disciples. It's a bit like how Jesus's appearance in art changes from Middle Eastern to European, African, etc. depending on the culture depicting him.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a quick portrait of a Daspletosaurus torosus that I did while listening to a series of Youtube interviews with paleontologist Thomas Carr (who specializes in tyrannosaurids). Daspletosaurus, which lived between 77 and 74 million years ago in North America, may have been the ancestor of Tyrannosaurus rex as well as the Asian Tarbosaurus bataar. The two species recognized within the Daspletosaurus genus are D. torosus and the later, more recently described D. horneri.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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I had this mental image of a woman dressed in red, standing in a field with a spear in hand, and that is what I drew. I wish I had more of a story in mind for this character, but not right now. I will say she came out looking rather South Sudanese to me, though.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This character would be a woman from ancient Egypt who has married into the imperial family of China after a long journey across the Indian Ocean. Her story was inspired by that of Queen Ankhesenamun, who was Pharaoh Tutankhamun's chief wife. After Tut died and his vizier Ay took over, Ankhesenamun's known to have requested a husband from the Hittites of Anatolia, only for the man they sent to die en route. It's likely that Ay and his goons had something to do with that. It makes me think Ankhesenamun really didn't want to be Ay's wife, so what if she fled the country afterwards? For all we know, she could have very well traveled all the way to China and married into the ruling Shang dynasty. Right now, though, her fate remains a mystery of ancient history...

By the way, the characters on the upper right spell "Egyptian" in Chinese.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a sketchbook portrait of my original character Nefrusheri. She was this Egyptian (or pseudo-Egyptian) warrior princess I created for a fantasy story wherein she had to retrieve a magic staff stolen by the Chinese (or pseudo-Chinese). Unfortunately I am still stumped on the plotting process, but I don't want to give up on it since I've given up on way too many projects in the past. Somehow I am going to figure out how to make it work!
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a warrior from one of the ancient Yue peoples, who lived in the subtropical jungles of southern China until the first millennium AD. Chinese sources portrayed them as tattooed savages without knowledge of bronze technology or even bows and arrows, but they seem to have been more than competent at cultivating rice, shipbuilding, ceramics, and working jade. Genetic analyses of their remains suggests an affinity with the Austronesian and Tai-Kadai peoples of Southeast Asia (as shown by high frequencies of the Y-chromosome haplogroup O1), but eventually they would be absorbed into the Chinese empire during the Han dynasty.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a spearman from Irem, a region of eastern Sudan mentioned in ancient Egyptian records during the New Kingdom. Its precise location is unknown (and not much information about it is easily available as far as I can tell), but it seems to have been somewhere further up the Nile from Kush. In the end, however, the Kushite kingdom would expand and annex the territory once designated as Irem.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a late-night sketchbook doodle of a generic dromaeosaurid (or "raptor") in attack mode. I have to say that, although I grew up on the lipped raptors of Jurassic Park, the crocodile-like lipless look for theropods is growing on me. On raptors, it gives them a reptilian edge despite their otherwise avian aspects.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a retro-style Tyrannosaurus rex that I drew while watching the old King Kong movie on a lazy afternoon. To be honest, the dinosaurs in the original Kong impress me far more than the titular gorilla, whom I think looks goofy and cartoonish for the comparison. Of course, the Kong inspiration is also why I added a ruined statue to the scene. I rather like the fantasy juxtaposition of prehistoric life with ancient ruins.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a design for a futuristic Egyptian vehicle, based on their ancient war chariots. I owe a lot of my inspiration here to the "Afrofuturism" movement, which sets out to combine pre-colonial African and Afro-Diasporan cultural influences with futuristic and science-fiction themes. I don't normally do futuristic stuff like this, but this was nonetheless a fun concept to design.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Inspired by the "Afrofuturism" movement, I've been toying with the idea of giving my original character Nefrusheri a futuristic redesign. She'd still be an Egyptian warrior princess, but from the future---that is, an alternate future where the ancient Egyptian civilization (aka Kemet) is still going strong. Not only would more advanced technology allow the characters to do things that they couldn't do with Bronze Age tech, but it also lets me give Nefrusheri an affinity for hip-hop. Because I just love the idea of a rapping Egyptian princess!
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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It's Thanksgiving today, and what better way for me to celebrate that than to draw a couple of the Wampanoag people whose generosity inspired the holiday to begin with? For those of you who don't know, the Wampanoag were an Algonquian-speaking Native American people who lived in the region of Massachusetts and Rhode Island prior to colonization by the English in the seventeenth century. They're best known as the people who taught the Pilgrims how to grow corn and take care of themselves in the New World, inspiring the first Thanksgiving celebration. Unfortunately, they still ended up decimated by European plagues and invasions, which is why Thanksgiving isn't a particularly popular holiday among Native Americans today, but you still got to pay the Wampanoag nation the respect they're owed.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Isis, the Egyptian goddess of wisdom and magic, spreads her wings in flight beneath a starry night sky. Because when you've drawn Isis as much as I have, sooner or later you got to show her with her wings.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Deinonychus antirrhopus, a larger cousin of the Velociraptor, pokes its head out of the undergrowth deep in the jungles of Early Cretaceous North America (115-108 million years ago). I really like portraying raptors like this as having a mix of reptilian and avian characteristics.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Watch out, it's an angry T. rex storming after you!
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This began as simple practice in drawing front-view portraits, but I wanted to imbue her with a bit more character and so made her a divination priestess from ancient Mali in West Africa. A number of traditional African religions have women responsible for divination, so it wouldn't surprise me if the Malians had female diviners too (at least prior to converting to Islam).
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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'Tis another fantasy world map I doodled in Photoshop. The names of continents and islands are all taken from various myths, legends, and folklore, as I was inspired by the concept of fictional "past ages" used by writers like J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard (the creators of Middle Earth and the Hyborian Age, respectively). And that's all I'm ready to say about this world at the moment, really.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is a lovely young female specimen of the Garamantes, a (presumably) Berber-speaking people whose civilization spread across the desert of modern-day Libya in ancient times. They had horse-drawn chariots, irrigated agriculture for their cities, and a history of both trade and conflict with the Roman Empire. Much like the kingdoms of Egypt and Kush along the Nile, the Garamantes would have acted as a commercial intermediary between the Mediterranean and sub-Saharan regions. Their civilization seems to have fallen as a result of Vandal conquests in North Africa and a drop in the local groundwater that fed their crops.

I couldn't find a ton of sources on how Garamantes women would have looked or dressed, so I let my imagination fill in the blanks with this character's look. However, her tattoos and face paint are inspired by those of modern Tuareg people who roam the Sahara today.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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A young warrior of the Garamantes people stands alert amidst the dunes of the Libyan desert.

To reiterate, the Garamantes were a (presumably) Berber-speaking people whose civilization lay in the desert of what is now Libya. They had a history of recurring conflicts with the Roman Empire, but were also trading partners whose commercial routes would have connected the Mediterranean and sub-Saharan regions.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Tacfarinas (d. 24 AD) was a leader of the Musulamii people, who lived as nomads in the Algerian Sahara south of the Roman imperial provinces of Numidia and Mauretania. Although once an auxiliary fighter for the Romans, he abandoned this position to lead his people in a rebellion against his former masters. His forces were able to harry the Roman legions before a final defeat in 24 AD, after which he committed suicide.

As for how Tacfarinas would have looked, I couldn't find any sculptures or other images of him dating to his time, so again I let my imagination fill in those blanks. That's one of the fun things about drawing historical individuals as obscure as this dude; you have a lot more creative leeway in reconstructing their likenesses.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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These are a couple of characters I created for a small "historical fantasy" project. The chick on the left is Tufayyur, Queen of the Garamantes in what is now Libya, and on the right is a Roman imperial officer named Claudius Atticus. At first they begin on bad terms with one another, but eventually they'll have to team up to defeat a villainous sorceress and her army of bandits in the North African desert.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This portrait shows my character Tufayyur, a Queen of the Garamantes in the Libyan Sahara. Although the Garamantes were a real North African civilization, Tufayyur herself was a fictional character I created for a little "historical fantasy" story. In it, she and a Roman military officer named Claudius were supposed to team up against an evil sorceress and her army of desert bandits. To be honest, the plot still needs fleshing out if not a total reworking, but I still kinda like Tufayyur's design.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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These are portraits of two theropod dinosaurs (Tyrannosaurus and Baryonyx) and an African-American chick in a cartoony style, which I doodled while listening to a online seminar on autism and exercise. The "webinar" turned out to have been a huge waste of time (it was directed not at autistic people themselves but to their parents and therapists), but at least I found something productive to do when it was playing.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This warrior is unsheathing her sword from its scabbard behind her back. No name for her yet, but I imagine she's some kind of adventurous bounty hunter or mercenary who does her fighting in exchange for coin.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This tough (yet prepossessing) cowgirl wields a couple of revolvers out on the plains of Texas. Apparently between a quarter and a third of cowboys out in the Old West were African-American, but I don't know how many (if any) of them would have been women.

The prairie in the background is based on my personal memories of Plano, TX, where I spent my preschool and kindergarten years. For the most part the place looked and felt more like the quintessential American suburb than anything evocative of cowboys or the Wild West, but I remember there were expanses of grassy plains and woodland here and there.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Tyrannosaurus rex recently heard certain primates claim he's incapable of roaring because certain distant relatives of his, the birds and crocodiles, don't. He begs to differ and wishes to voice his opinion on the matter as loudly as possible.

Mind you, there's no guarantee that any dinosaurs were capable of roaring, either. It's hard to say without finding their fossilized vocal chords. I just find the argument that dinosaurs couldn't produce roar-like vocalizations (because extant birds and crocs don't) rather unpersuasive. Birds and crocs may be the closest living relatives of extinct dinosaurs, but they're still further removed than house cats are from lions and tigers. So their usefulness as proxies for how extinct dinosaurs might have looked and acted is rather limited in my view.
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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Listening to some heavy metal music put me in the mood to draw this sexy devil babe. I have to say she came out, shall we say, quite bedazzling?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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After doing the sexy devil girl, the next logical step was, of course, to follow up with a sexy angel girl. Because who says angels can't be sexy as well?
 
Posted by Tyrannohotep (Member # 3735) on :
 
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This is my interpretation of Anput, an Egyptian goddess who presided over embalming and mummification. She was the wife of the jackal-masked Anpu (better known as Anubis), with whom she had their daughter Kebechet (goddess of embalming fluid). Here, she's holding one of the four canopic jars which held the deceased's organs during the mummification process.
 


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