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Posted by Oshun (Member # 19740) on :
 
I was reading some stuff from a book (which if memory serves is purty old). I wanted some updated information, and any resources on this issue, if what it's saying is remotely correct. It described tribes in the predynastic that were assigned nomes and nomarchs during the dynastic period. Then it says something like these tribes having their own totems and gods. So, did each nome kind of have a tribal identity? Were the nomarchs former/modern concepts of chiefs? and if so, how long did that kind of tribal identity within Egypt last for? Because if this is true, Egypt was composed of 40+ dominant tribes that answered to the pharaoh...
 
Posted by Clyde Winters (Member # 10129) on :
 
Check out this site http://www.egyptsearch.com/forums/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=15;t=005932
 
Posted by Itoli (Member # 22743) on :
 
What support did they give for that?
 
Posted by Oshun (Member # 19740) on :
 
That's just the thing, it didn't say where this information was sourced, so I was looking to see if anyone else found any sources that would agree/disagree with what they were saying:

quote:
The Pre-Dynastic Period, which we suppose extended from about 5000 b. c., or earlier, until about 3400 b. c., is the period before that covered by Manetho's dynasties. At the beginning of this period Egypt was divided into 42 districts, which the Egyptians called spt or hsp, and which the Greeks afterwards called nomes. Each nome was occupied by a different tribe, which at the first lived in isolation from the other tribes. Each tribe had its god, to which an animal was sacred. This condition prevailed for so many centuries that the customs of this time became permanently fixed.

 
Posted by Itoli (Member # 22743) on :
 
Sound like an assumption based off the shared cultures in various Nomes. Notice they mention the religions but shared religion doesn't necessitate shared origin.
 
Posted by Fourty2Tribes (Member # 21799) on :
 
Abd'el Hakim Awyan made that argument.
http://www.khemitology.com/khemitology/


quote:
The people of ancient Khemit, referred to later as Sesh, became the original 42 tribes of Africa who, recognizing their connectedness to all that is, considered themselves equal in every way. People we now refer to as Hebrews, Tibetans, Russians, Europeans and the many tribes of our Black African Nations, were all, according to the indigenous tradition, originally tribes of ancient Khemit. These were a highly advanced people, who, utilizing 360 natural senses, were capable of great feats of manifestation, alchemy, and trans-dimensional journeying. They had no need of a written or oral language, or the confines of labels, and lived peacefully and naturally with the rhythms, energies and frequencies of their environment and the cosmos.

 
Posted by Oshun (Member # 19740) on :
 
Hi guys I figured that it's worth noting that at least during the pre dynastic and early dynastic, Egypt was not unified and didn't have a consciousness as such, so what was there then? Saying that, I hear these theories about tribes spreading, but what is the evidence that there was differentiation that would constitute tribes?

This site for example has put fourth the argument that the Temehu were indigenous to Egypt and that lower Egypt even bears the same name (Tameh'et), implying that Libyans/Berbers could've been very populous in the Delta.


quote:
This simple fact was known to many scholars and Egyptologists, like Sir Alan Gardiner who has noted that the name of the Libyan tribe Temeh'w means “Lower Egypt” as well as the “Delta”, whence mh's “the crown of Lower Egypt”. The name was also mentioned as Henet-Temehu, the princess daughter of Thenet-Hep, the wife of Ahmose I, which further illustrates the Libyan element in the Egyptian dynasties, as we shall see below.
quote:


From the first dynasty onwards the Libyans continued their attempts to reclaim Lower Egypt. During the start of the dynastic period the name Tehenu was found inscribed on the "Narmar Palette" and also reappeared during the second and the third dynasties (2778- 2723 BC), when, according to Manetho, the Libyans continued the struggle against the invading Pharaohs and particularly against Nefer-Ka-Re.

https://www.temehu.com/Temehu.htm

Some
 
Posted by the questioner (Member # 22195) on :
 
Nomes is a Greek term
the correct term would be sepat
 
Posted by Ekwensu007 (Member # 22863) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by the questioner:
Nomes is a Greek term
the correct term would be sepat

In Igbo the word would be "isi obodo". Head of the city/nation/ancestral home or "capital city".

Kemet was treated as 42 capital cities. "Totems" are indigenous banking institutions and centers of commerce, financing, taxation, scientific research etc. you name it.
 
Posted by Doug M (Member # 7650) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Oshun:
I was reading some stuff from a book (which if memory serves is purty old). I wanted some updated information, and any resources on this issue, if what it's saying is remotely correct. It described tribes in the predynastic that were assigned nomes and nomarchs during the dynastic period. Then it says something like these tribes having their own totems and gods. So, did each nome kind of have a tribal identity? Were the nomarchs former/modern concepts of chiefs? and if so, how long did that kind of tribal identity within Egypt last for? Because if this is true, Egypt was composed of 40+ dominant tribes that answered to the pharaoh...

From Fetish to God in ancient Egypt is the best book on this by Wallace Budge.

As for "tribes" all populations around the planet were organized into "tribes" before civilization started. But we don't know the details about all of the sepats in AE and how they were created. Some were definitely named after "tribes" as in the first Sepat: Ta Seti, which was named after the culture in the area that may have also been called Ta Seti. Other than that, nobody knows for sure how the nome names correlate with specific pre dynastic populations and or deities outside specific notable examples.

In general many African populations had "fetishes", icons or totems they used to represent their deities in some fashion. You can find this across Africa and in East Africa. So to me it is just a continuation of African rituals and traditions.
 
Posted by Linda Fahr (Member # 21979) on :
 
To Fourty2Tribes

Was one of these tribes out of Africa the people Ga, which are living in West Africa?
I found the name "Gana" in India. They were mentioned in Vedas as warriors, beside other functions. Then, I look for them at the Yogini temples, because a Hindu Priest told me that were African females that introduced yoga in India.

I founded many similarities among Yoginis of India and the Shai (SE)girls from the Ga people in Ghana. Now...when they arrived in India, I don't know yet. Their circular temples were built in 1000s AD.
 


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